Title

  • Wild Fermentation

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Wild Fermentation

The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods

Overview

From the publisher

Bread. Cheese. Wine. Beer. Coffee. Chocolate. Most people consume fermented foods and drinks every day. For thousands of years, humans have enjoyed the distinctive flavors and nutrition resulting from the transformative power of microscopic bacteria and fungi.

“Fermentation has been an important journey of discovery for me,” writes Wild Fermentation author Sandor Ellix Katz. “I invite you to join me along this effervescent path, well trodden for thousands of years yet largely forgotten in our time and place, bypassed by the superhighway of industrial food production.”

The book covers vegetable ferments such as sauerkraut, kimchi, and sour pickles; bean ferments including miso, tempeh, dosas, and idli; dairy ferments including yogurt, kefir, and basic cheesemaking (as well as vegan alternatives); sourdough breadmaking; extremely simple wine- and beer-making techniques; and vinegar-making. With nearly 100 recipes, this is the most comprehensive and wide-ranging fermentation cookbook ever published.

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1. by anonymous on Nov 19, 2007 at 8:17 AM PST

wild fermentation is like a history book where it tells you a lot of important things of the past, its nice because you learn how to make a lot of homade food, so you eat healthy, not as the goverment wants you to spend money that in the end goes back to him Thank you Sandor and thank you for substain the Bioregionali in italy

2. by Hella Delicious on Mar 9, 2009 at 6:03 PM PDT

This is a great book. jam packed with recipes and tips and other great info so you can make your own most healthy food. I learned how to make delicious wild-foraged milkweed capers and I have a jar of burdock kimchi fermenting on my fridge at the moment. I highly recommend this book.

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