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Rice Bowl with Beef, Onions, Collards, Fried Egg, and Corn Chile Remoulade

From the book Smoke and Pickles by
Serves 4 to 6

Introduction

Whenever I can successfully marry my love for Asian BBQ with my favorite Southern ingredients, I know I’ve made something special. The marinade for this beef was inspired by the popular Korean bulgogi sauce, and the collards are a true Southern icon.

Ingredients

Corn chile remoulade

1 tsp. unsalted butter
2 ears corn, shucked and kernels removed
¼ cup Perfect Remoulade
1 tsp. chile powder

Marinade

1 garlic clove, grated
1 tsp. grated fresh ginger
3 Tbsp. soy sauce
1 Tbsp. Asian sesame oil
2 tsp. fresh lemon juice
2 tsp. sugar
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Meat

1 flat-iron steak (1 pound total), thinly sliced
1 Tbsp. Asian sesame oil

Collards

1 Tbsp. olive oil
1 Tbsp. unsalted butter
1 cup diced onions
1 bunch collards (12 ounces total), ribs removed, roughly chopped
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. apple-cider vinegar

Eggs

Tbsp. unsalted butter
4 large eggs, preferably organic

Rice

4 cups cooked rice

Steps

  1. Make the corn chili remoulade: Melt the butter in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add the corn and sauté for 3 to 4 minutes, until tender. Remove from the heat, stir in the Perfect Remoulade and chile powder, and set aside.
  2. Marinate the beef: Combine all the marinade ingredients in a bowl. Add the steak slices, turning to coat. Allow to marinate for 20 minutes at room temperature.
  3. Cook the collards: While the steak is marinating, heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat in a large skillet until the butter melts. Add the onions and cook for 8 to 10 minutes, until caramelized and nicely browned. Add the collard greens, salt, and vinegar, and sauté for 5 minutes, or until the collard greens are wilted. These aren’t braised collards, so don’t cook all the color out of them — they should be wilted but still with enough crunch to keep your mouth happy. Transfer the collards to a warm plate and cover to keep warm.
  4. Cook the steak: Heat the sesame oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the steak slices with the marinade and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 to 5 minutes, until the beef is browned and cooked all the way through. Transfer the beef to a bowl and keep warm until ready to serve.
  5. Cook the eggs: In the same skillet, melt the butter. Fry the eggs sunny-side up one at a time. Keep warm until ready to serve.
  6. To serve: Scoop the rice into your rice bowls. Spoon the collard greens over the rice and place the beef over the greens. Place a fried egg over the beef in each bowl and spoon about a tablespoon of the remoulade over the egg. Serve immediately, with spoons — it is best to mix everything together before enjoying.

This content is from the book Smoke and Pickles by Edward Lee.

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