Table Talk: March 17

All things Japanese

By
March 14, 2011

(Editor’s note: This chat is over, but the transcript is available to read here. And join Kim for another Table Talk chat soon.)

In part because she’s been thinking of little else this week, Kim O’Donnel is bringing the subject of Japan to her Table Talk chat, this Thursday, March 17, at 10 a.m. PT, 1 p.m. ET.

Do you cook Japanese food — or would you like to? Join Kim for a one-hour, online chat about Japanese foods and cooking — and whatever else comes up.

Kim, a trained chef and cookbook author, will be on hand to give cooking advice too, so bring your how-to questions as well. Sign up below to receive an email reminder of the chat.

See you Thursday, right here.

 Table Talk with Kim O'Donnel - March 17, 2011(03/17/2011) 
9:55
Kim ODonnel: 
Coming up at the top of the hour: A tribute to all things Japanese, in the wake of the catastrophe in Japan. Join us for the conversation.
Thursday March 17, 2011 9:55 Kim ODonnel
10:05
Kim ODonnel: 
This time last week, life in Japan was as normal as it gets. Hours later, everything would change with a historic 9.0 earthquake, resulting tsunami, dozens of aftershocks and a nuclear crisis that refuses to quiet. So many of us on the other side of the Pacific are wringing our hands over the endless devastation and what we can do to help. So let's talk. Share your recipes, reports from friends and loved ones, stories and your thoughts on how to pay tribute to Japan. I'm all eyes and ears.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:05 Kim ODonnel
10:05
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Hi, Kim!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:05 mamster
10:06
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey Mamster, nice to have you on board today. Got a favorite recipe to share or tip on how to help disaster victims out?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:06 Kim ODonnel
10:08
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I wish I could do something to help. Iris and I made an all-time great sukiyaki this week.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:08 mamster
10:09
Kim ODonnel: 
Awesome. I think cooking is one of the best tributes of all. I know it's not money in the donation bank, but it's a way of creating good vibrations. Can you give some pointers on how to make a kick-butt sukiyaki?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:09 Kim ODonnel
10:09
[Comment From Jill, The Veggie Queen Jill, The Veggie Queen : ] 
Only know a few people there and they are OK. But it's a big mess obviously.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:09 Jill, The Veggie Queen
10:10
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey Jill, thanks for joining. I imagine one of the people you're referring to is Elizabeth Andoh, cookbook author and teacher. She sent an email newsletter letting folks know she is safe but as to be imagined, life is completely upside down.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:10 Kim ODonnel
10:10
[Comment From Jill, The Veggie Queen Jill, The Veggie Queen : ] 
I am recommending that people here eat more sea vegetables, miso, and mushrooms (sorry Kim) plus cruciferous vegetables to help combat andy rise in floating rradiation.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:10 Jill, The Veggie Queen
10:11
Kim ODonnel: 
Jill, I'm sorry too that I can't eat mushrooms! That's a great action item. Speaking of proactive stuff, how many of you have an emergency readiness kit? We are finally getting our act together here on that front.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:11 Kim ODonnel
10:11
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Sure. I have a recipe on Culinate somewhere. In short: use good, marbled, thin-sliced beef. Shirataki noodles. Lots of napa cabbage. Broiled tofu.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:11 mamster
10:11
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
And cooking the meat at the table is fun.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:11 mamster
10:13
Kim ODonnel: 
Thanks, Mamster! Have you heard any news on the Seattle front what's happening in the way of fund raising?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:13 Kim ODonnel
10:13
[Comment From Jill, The Veggie Queen Jill, The Veggie Queen : ] 
Yes, one is Elizabeth. I hear, though, that people we are speaking of people in Japan that they are still somewhat orderly amid chaos. Not hte American way.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:13 Jill, The Veggie Queen
10:15
Kim ODonnel: 
I heard an interview yesterday on NPR w/ a woman who was sorting through trash for recycling, that thinking about her collapsed house was too much to bear and so she said (thru an interpreter) that she plans to stay at a community center for time being and make order out of chaos.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:15 Kim ODonnel
10:15
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Kim, I hate to be the one to say this, but there is no way to donate money that will directly help Japan. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/16/world/asia/16charity.html
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:15 mamster
10:16
Kim ODonnel: 
Mamster, we're all for transparency here. This very topic is something I've been thinking about over the past few days.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:16 Kim ODonnel
10:16
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
A general-purpose donation to the Red Cross or Doctors Without Borders is always a good thing, of course.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:16 mamster
10:16
[Comment From Jill, The Veggie Queen Jill, The Veggie Queen : ] 
Kim, my sister who has food storage reminded me about doing so. I have plenty around, should I need it. I do, though, have to replenish and update my water supply and keep my stoves fueled and at the ready.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:16 Jill, The Veggie Queen
10:17
Kim ODonnel: 
See Jill, I hadn't even thought about portable stove. So smart. I was just thinking about immediate water, flashlight, etc, but a portable burner makes so much sense.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:17 Kim ODonnel
10:19
Kim ODonnel: 
Here in Seattle (and in Oregon), we're long overdue for a major earthquake, and so many of us are simply unprepared. guilty as charged.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:19 Kim ODonnel
10:19
[Comment From Jill, The Veggie Queen Jill, The Veggie Queen : ] 
Burner is great if you want to cook or at least have coffee or tea. I use the butane burners for cooking demos and they work well..
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:19 Jill, The Veggie Queen
10:19
Kim ODonnel: 
I know these burners all too well for demos & have overlooked their utility for emergency use. Yes indeed.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:19 Kim ODonnel
10:21
Kim ODonnel: 
I have yet to find out if the big Asian grocery here in Seattle, Uwajimaya, is planning any kind of fund raiser, or if they'd have thoughts on how to get money spent on a very local level.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:21 Kim ODonnel
10:23
Kim ODonnel: 
Elizabeth Andoh's books, including the most recent, Kanshu -- which is vegetarian focused. What other Japanese cookbooks do folks like to use?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:23 Kim ODonnel
10:23
[Comment From Jeann in Seattle Jeann in Seattle : ] 
I'm here! Sorry for being late!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:23 Jeann in Seattle
10:24
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey Jeanne! Welcome. Got a favorite japanese drink or eat to share?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:24 Kim ODonnel
10:24
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
The problem, Kim, is that Japan is a very wealthy country and has already committed to spending whatever it takes to rebuild. That's not to take a rosy view of the competence of the Japanese government, but there's no way you or I can figure out a better way to get our money to the right people.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:24 mamster
10:24
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I'd strongly encourage anyone who wants to donate money to give an unrestricted donation to an established aid organization.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:24 mamster
10:25
Kim ODonnel: 
Good insight, Mamster. You should be writing a post about this!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:25 Kim ODonnel
10:25
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Ooh, Japanese cookbooks. The best is still Shizuo Tsuji's _Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art._
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:25 mamster
10:25
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
But my favorite in recent years is Tadashi Ono and Harris Salat's _Japanese Hot Pots._
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:25 mamster
10:26
Kim ODonnel: 
Tadashi Ono is great! I have that book, should pull it out. I was also thinking about tea....faves?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:26 Kim ODonnel
10:26
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
An incredible book: almost every recipe in it can be made in about half an hour, and they're fantastically delicious.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:26 mamster
10:26
[Comment From redweather. redweather. : ] 
here's a post from apartment therapy on how to create a food store that would last for a year - http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/how-to/how-to-start-a-food-storage-on-10-a-week-138765
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:26 redweather.
10:27
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey redweather, thanks for this. Good stuff that we all need to become better versed at, including yours truly.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:27 Kim ODonnel
10:27
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Favorite teas or favorite books about tea?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:27 mamster
10:28
Kim ODonnel: 
Either! I'm thinking about the Heiss's book -- The Story of Tea. Wonderful resource.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:28 Kim ODonnel
10:29
Kim ODonnel: 
Genmaicha is one of my favorite green teas. Perhaps I should make a pot this afternoon & have a little meditation.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:29 Kim ODonnel
10:29
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Tea, you're talking my language.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:29 Jeanne in Seattle
10:29
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
That's the one I was going to mention, too. Fabulous book. I love it when someone sets out to write THE book on a subject and succeeds.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:29 mamster
10:30
Kim ODonnel: 
The Heiss's are great people, too. I learned how to brew tea from their first book.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:30 Kim ODonnel
10:30
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Mamster (hi!), I will check out that cookbook. I am woefully deficient in Japanese cookbooks.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:30 Jeanne in Seattle
10:30
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Oh, here's something specific I'm planning to do. My favorite place to buy tea is from o-cha.com, which is in Iwaki City, in Fukushima. They're out of commission at the moment, obviously, but the owner of the company is fine and is determined to reopen. When he does, I'm planning to put in a big order. My favorite tea of theirs is the Kagoshima Sencha Sae Midori.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:30 mamster
10:31
Kim ODonnel: 
Mamster, this is a GREAT idea. Can you please let us know when they do re-open? I bet many of us would join you in this effort.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:31 Kim ODonnel
10:31
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
OK, the Story of Tea goes on the list, too.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:31 Jeanne in Seattle
10:31
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne, The Story of Tea is not only beautifully photographed but is a great work of scholarship. Probably the best book on tea out there.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:31 Kim ODonnel
10:31
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Can I just say that my dad used to live in Japan and it has a special place in my heart? I am devastated by what's happened.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:31 Jeanne in Seattle
10:33
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne, did you ever get there because of your dad's travels? Were there things he'd bring back that got you aquainted with the culture?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:33 Kim ODonnel
10:33
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Yeah, I'm sure I'll mention it on Twitter, at the very least. @mamster
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:33 mamster
10:34
Kim ODonnel: 
My most intimate connection with Japan comes out of my days teaching ESL in the early 90s. I had several Japanese students, many of them business execs but also wives of execs. They all opened their hearts to me in some way.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:34 Kim ODonnel
10:34
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I am too, Jeanne. I went to Japan for the first time last year and began what I hope will be a lifelong relationship with the country.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:34 mamster
10:35
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Yes, I spent a fair amount of time there. That's where I learned to use chopsticks! We visited him for long periods of time.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:35 Jeanne in Seattle
10:35
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I have a beautiful and amazing kimono that I used to wear there. And i loved the socks with the toe shoe indentation.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:35 Jeanne in Seattle
10:37
Kim ODonnel: 
I was about to move there in the early 90s to continue teaching in Honshu. Life got in the way, but it's always been on my mind to go.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:37 Kim ODonnel
10:37
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Mamster: and your daughter went with you, yes? Lucky girl!!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:37 Jeanne in Seattle
10:37
Kim ODonnel: 
Have any of you ever made Japanese sweets? I've always been curious...
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:37 Kim ODonnel
10:37
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
That's right, Jeanne.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:37 mamster
10:38
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I've eaten Japanese sweets but have never made them. I believe there's someone who gives classes in Seattle.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:38 mamster
10:38
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I have to say, you hear about the Japanese being reserved and strict, and they are. But I so clearly remember all the Japanese, from the strict businessmen to the Sumo wrestlers, being so kind. I think they were charmed by an American girl who was eager to embrace their culture.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:38 Jeanne in Seattle
10:39
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne, I had a similar experience when teaching. At first, my students were very reserved. Then they let go. They invited the teachers to their home to cook. They were goofy, eager to learn language and culture. It was an important time for me.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:39 Kim ODonnel
10:40
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
There's a bakery in Seattle (in the Tangletown area) that is a combo of Japanese and French pastries. Hiro (maybe)? Let me go look it up.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:40 Jeanne in Seattle
10:41
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
It's actually Hiroki. If you're in Seattle, go check it out.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:41 Jeanne in Seattle
10:42
Kim ODonnel: 
Cool.Thanks for sharing, Jeanne. There are so many interesting Japanese nuggets here in Seattle.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:42 Kim ODonnel
10:42
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Japanese sweets....say, that's another area that I look forward to experimenting on with gluten-free!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:42 Jeanne in Seattle
10:42
Kim ODonnel: 
I imagine gluten-free baking would be a great partner with Japanese sweets...
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:42 Kim ODonnel
10:43
Kim ODonnel: 
Sake -- who drinks it? Faves?
And Japanese soy sauce -- favorite brand?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:43 Kim ODonnel
10:45
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sigh, soy sauce I miss you. We were using a gluten-free form of tamari (a more mellow soy sauce), San-J. They my daughter was diagnosed with a soy allergy. No more soy sauce for us. Bleh.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:45 Jeanne in Seattle
10:46
Kim ODonnel: 
That is a major bummer, Jeanne. San-J seems to be the most commonly available tamari in the US. Any others I'm missing?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:46 Kim ODonnel
10:46
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Sake: My favorite inexpensive sake is Hakutsuru, either the draft (very cheap and surprisingly good) or the junmai ginjo (only a little pricier and very good).
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:46 mamster
10:46
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Jeanne, the good news is you can still have fish sauce, right?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:46 mamster
10:47
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I don't drink too much sake, but I have friends who have elevated it to an art form. They have the whole set, and they savor it. I have a set somewhere around, but I don't use it much.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:47 Jeanne in Seattle
10:47
Kim ODonnel: 
Mamster, do you ever cook with sake?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:47 Kim ODonnel
10:48
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I do. I have on my to-do list to make Melissa Clark's sake-steamed chicken from last week's NYT food section. Let me find the link.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:48 mamster
10:48
Kim ODonnel: 
Now that would be a great culinary tribute! Sake-steamed chicken or fish or veg...like that idea.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:48 Kim ODonnel
10:48
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/09/dining/09apperex.html
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:48 mamster
10:48
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Mamster: yes! I still check labels like crazy. Also, I just made a soy-sauce-without-soy recipe. The base is mushrooms. It's tasty.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:48 Jeanne in Seattle
10:49
Kim ODonnel: 
How resourceful of you, Jeanne! You must share those details at some point.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:49 Kim ODonnel
10:49
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
So many restaurant/shops in town are having special events now to raise money for Japan. Tonight one of my favorite gourmet food/wine shops is having a wine tasting to raise fund. I think this grass roots thing is awesome.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:49 Jeanne in Seattle
10:50
Kim ODonnel: 
In Seattle, I had heard that Oddfellows donated 100 percent of its sales the other night to a fund, but don't know which one. Heard about something going on at Boat Street Cafe. What else?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:50 Kim ODonnel
10:51
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kim: I didn't develop the recipe. I found it online at Wicked Good Dinner. I love it when folks get super-creative and create something delicious. It's not super-soy-y, but it tastes good and adds that salty + umami kick to things.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:51 Jeanne in Seattle
10:51
Kim ODonnel: 
That's really what you need -- the umami quotient. Glad you've been able to find an alternative!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:51 Kim ODonnel
10:51
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Picnic, up on Greenwood, is the one having a wine tasting to benefit Japan.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:51 Jeanne in Seattle
10:52
Kim ODonnel: 
Just remembered that the Cherry Blossom festival in DC is coming up. Bittersweet this year.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:52 Kim ODonnel
10:52
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Yes, hanami in Seattle is coming up too.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:52 mamster
10:52
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
On the quad at UW, in a couple weeks, whenever the blossoms are at their height.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:52 mamster
10:53
Kim ODonnel: 
I have yet to do that since moving to Seattle a few years ago. It's now on my to-do list!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:53 Kim ODonnel
10:53
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Hello and OT re: soy sauce, I use imported Kikkoman. WAY different than the domestic brand, and always available at Asian groceries.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:53 Culinaria Eugenius
10:54
Kim ODonnel: 
Culinaria Eugenius -- is the imported Kikkoman labeled diferently?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:54 Kim ODonnel
10:54
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Yes, the cherry blossoms on the UW Quad are amazing. Lovely.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:54 Jeanne in Seattle
10:54
Kim ODonnel: 
I went to an amazing dinner in DC a few years ago hosted by Kikkoman. Many did they pull out the stops.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:54 Kim ODonnel
10:55
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Yes, and it's a different bottle (larger and plastic). I think I may have a photo somewhere on my blog. I'll look it up.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:55 Culinaria Eugenius
10:55
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Also, can we talk properly made Japanese rice? I'm still learning how to do it well, but I'm getting better and better. I use it to create cute Bento box lunches for my daughter.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:55 Jeanne in Seattle
10:55
Kim ODonnel: 
Yes please! Boiled or made in a rice cooker?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:55 Kim ODonnel
10:56
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I like the imported Kikkoman at lot, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kikkoman_litre_bottles.jpg The one on the left is what I buy.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:56 mamster
10:56
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
That must have been sweet.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:56 Culinaria Eugenius
10:57
Kim ODonnel: 
Culinaria, it was a seriously swanky event, one that has gone unrivalled ever since!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:57 Kim ODonnel
10:57
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Rice cooker. I keep working and working at it.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:57 Jeanne in Seattle
10:57
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
What kind of rice do you start with, Jeanne? I have gotten hooked on the more expensive short-grain, like Tamaki Gold or Nozomi brands.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:57 mamster
10:57
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I have to say, one my daughter's favorite snacks from babyhood is onigiri--rice balls. Yumm.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:57 Jeanne in Seattle
10:57
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne, do you season with gomasio?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:57 Kim ODonnel
10:57
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
My daughter is crazy for onigiri, too.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:57 mamster
10:58
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Mamster: I've been jumping around. I will check out those brands.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:58 Jeanne in Seattle
10:58
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We do season with gomasio--one of her favorite seasonings!
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:58 Jeanne in Seattle
10:58
Kim ODonnel: 
Here in Seattle, World Spice makes a delicious gomasio, with both black and lighter sesame seeds, fyi.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:58 Kim ODonnel
10:59
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I read this article about life in Tokyo after the quake, and one man was quoted saying that after his first 90 minutes walking home, he got hungry and went into a convenience store for onigiri, but they were already out. And I smiled because that's what I would have gone for, too.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:59 mamster
10:59
Kim ODonnel: 
Sweet. Sounds like we should all be making some onigiri in tribute.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:59 Kim ODonnel
10:59
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Onigiri is so awesome. It's a shame that Americans don't know more about it. Perfect snack food.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:59 Jeanne in Seattle
10:59
Kim ODonnel: 
Do you use white or brown rice?
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:59 Kim ODonnel
10:59
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Re: rice, I've always used Kokuho Rose.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:59 Culinaria Eugenius
10:59
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We store our gomasio in the fridge--the sesame seeds go rancid quickly.
Thursday March 17, 2011 10:59 Jeanne in Seattle
11:00
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Just saw a horrible pic of a Tokyo grocery store with empty shelves. Hard to even imagine.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:00 Culinaria Eugenius
11:01
Kim ODonnel: 
We probably saw the same pic, Culinaria. That image sticks with me, too.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:01 Kim ODonnel
11:01
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Love onigiri! What are your favorite fillings?
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:01 Culinaria Eugenius
11:01
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We used brown rice when my daughter was little. Now we're also doing white rice.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:01 Jeanne in Seattle
11:01
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Jeanne, is there a trick to making onigiri stay moist until lunchtime? Mine sometimes are fine and sometimes get hard and chalky.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:01 mamster
11:01
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Can't find my pic of soy sauce, but this is one example: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004CD33DC/ref=asc_df_B004CD33DC1461293?smid=A2XHOWDS6RAZ6X&tag=dealtmp462045-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395105&creativeASIN=B004CD33DC
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:01 Culinaria Eugenius
11:02
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We do the umeboshi paste. Also tuna (we're weird). Often just plain.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:02 Jeanne in Seattle
11:02
Kim ODonnel: 
Speaking of rice cookers, what should one look for when buying?
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:02 Kim ODonnel
11:02
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Mamster: I think an airtight container. Or covering most of it with nori. My daughter likes the "crunchy" ends. Also, you can lay it in a bed of lettuce and cover with nori.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:02 Jeanne in Seattle
11:03
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
Oh right, tuna! I used to make hosomaki with tunafish. We can our own Oregon albacore and I bet that would make fantastic onigiri. But I have to say I love umeboshi best.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:03 Culinaria Eugenius
11:04
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We have a National rice cooker (awesome, by the way). It's finally dying after 11 years. Next we're getting a Zojirushi.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:04 Jeanne in Seattle
11:04
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
And that pickled kombu with shiso flavoring. Can't remember the name.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:04 Culinaria Eugenius
11:04
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
CE: Yes the combo of the sweet inside and salty outside is awesome!
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:04 Jeanne in Seattle
11:05
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
I have a "neuro-fuzzy" Zojirushi I bought in Japan in '93 that's still going strong. I think they still sell that model (or its descendant) at Williams-Sonoma.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:05 Culinaria Eugenius
11:05
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Mamster: they have little onigiri containers that are the size of 1 onigiri. Super cute and cut down on the air that gets into the onigiri. Fits into a larger lunchbox.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:05 Jeanne in Seattle
11:06
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
I have one of those little containers but haven't tried it yet!
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:06 mamster
11:07
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Also, my daughter has grown up eating nori plain. Anyone else? It's not my favorite, but I love that she loves it.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:07 Jeanne in Seattle
11:08
Kim ODonnel: 
It's time to pack up, folks. Thanks so much for dropping by and sharing your various morsels in tribute to Japan, its rich culture and cuisine. The country may be upended for the moment & there's no doubt it will take some time before some sense of normal life resumes. But recipes live on & I truly believe that's how we can pay tribute to a country that is deeply suffering. So, let's eat and drink to Japan! Thanks again. All best.
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:08 Kim ODonnel
11:08
[Comment From mamster mamster : ] 
Thanks, Kim!
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:08 mamster
11:08
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Thank you!!!
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:08 Jeanne in Seattle
11:08
[Comment From Culinaria Eugenius Culinaria Eugenius : ] 
thanks!
Thursday March 17, 2011 11:08 Culinaria Eugenius
11:08
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Table Talk

Kim O’Donnel is a trained chef, nationally recognized online food personality, and a longtime journalist. She is the author of a new cookbook, The Meat Lover’s Meatless Cookbook.

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