Table Talk: November 17

A local-foods feast

By
November 14, 2011

(Editor’s note: This chat is over, but the transcript is available to read here. And join Kim for another Table Talk soon.)

Have you thought about cooking a Thanksgiving dinner made up mostly of locally grown foods?

This week, two guests, Josh Viertel and Jennifer Maiser, join Kim O’Donnel to discuss the essence of the 100-Mile Thanksgiving. Viertel is president of Slow Food USA, which has just published a guide for cooking a Thanksgiving feast with locally grown food, complete with recipe links, information on heritage turkeys, and more.

Apple-Pecan Stuffing

Maiser is founder of the Eat Local Challenge, a group blog focused on the importance of locally and sustainably grown food.

Bring your questions, suggestion, and ideas to this Thanksgiving-themed chat — including any cooking how-to questions for Kim. The chat takes place right here on Thursday, November 17, at 10 a.m. PT, 1 p.m. ET. Insert your email address below to receive an email reminder.

See you Thursday!

Kim O’Donnel, a trained chef and cookbook author, hosts chats frequently, right here. You can always check the Table Talk page to see when the next chat will take place.


 Table Talk with Kim O'Donnel - Nov. 17, 2011(11/17/2011) 
9:43
Kim ODonnel: 
How to put on a local Thanksgiving: Join me and Slow Food USA president Josh Viertel & Eat Local Challenge founder Jennifer Maiser, coming up at the top of the hour!
Thursday November 17, 2011 9:43 Kim ODonnel
10:00
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey folks! The Thanksgiving countdown has begun -- 7 days from now, many of us will be standing at the stove or just sitting down to the table on America's biggest feast of the year. We've got a special treat for you today, with two guests who are always thinking about how to incorporate ingredients from our respective local woodsheds, from the everyday to the elaborate. Please welcome Josh Viertel, president of Slow Food USA and Jennifer Maiser, founder of the Eat Local Challenge. They're with us for the next hour sharing their insights and tips on how to get as local as you can everyday. I'm also here to take on your meatless Tgiving questions and concerns. Let's roll!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:00 Kim ODonnel
10:00
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Here. So glad to be able to join the Thanksgiving chat - I always get great ideas. :)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:00 Lizka
10:00
[Comment From M M : ] 
THANK YOU, Kim, for your years-ago recipe for African sweet potato stew made with peanut butter. Fractured tooth repaired (sort of) on a cold, wet day -- that stew was the perfect, warming, fragrant, nourishing comfort when absolutely no other soft food seemed appealing (cottage cheese has significant limits as a comfort food...). Thank you!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:00 M
10:01
Kim ODonnel: 
I just realized this may be my 12th year of doing some kind of Thanksgiving chat! Glad you're here with us today.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:01 Kim ODonnel
10:01
Kim ODonnel: 
Josh, can you give us the lowdown on Slow Food USA's Thanksgiving guide?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:01 Kim ODonnel
10:02
Josh Viertel: 
Kim, It is such a pleasure to be joining you. I'm just sorry we aren't sitting face to face over a nice meal. Josh
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:02 Josh Viertel
10:02
Kim ODonnel: 
And Jen, if you wouldn't mind, sharing with readers a little about the ELC and how it all got started...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:02 Kim ODonnel
10:02
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Ooo - that recipe M referenced sounds amazing. Can M or Kim provide the details?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:02 Lizka
10:02
Kim ODonnel: 
Lizka, I'm not sure I remember the stew M refers to. I wonder if it was sweet potato curry, perhaps?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:02 Kim ODonnel
10:03
jen_maiser: 
Hi, everyone. Really happy to be on the chat from sunny (but brisk) San Francisco. I founded the Eat Local Challenge in 2005, and over the years we've had literally thousands of people participating in challenges throughout the year, but people seem to really love eating locally around Thanksgiving time. It's a natural -- many of the traditional Thanksgiving dishes are actually seasonal, which is helpful.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:03 jen_maiser
10:03
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I'm here!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:03 Jeanne in Seattle
10:03
jen_maiser: 
(hi, jeanne!)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:03 jen_maiser
10:04
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey Jeanne! Welcome. How do you get local w/ your Thanksgiving feast?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:04 Kim ODonnel
10:04
Josh Viertel: 
The Thanksgiving Guide is a resource for people who want to have a Slow Food Thanksgiving. There are recipes, tips and tricks for how to make cooking for a big family event fun and stress free, resources for finding heritage turkeys and local food, and some background on the origin of the holiday. You can find it at http:www.slowfoodusa.org/thanksgiving2011 Check it out. --Josh
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:04 Josh Viertel
10:05
Kim ODonnel: 
Josh, I know one of the things that trips folks up is how to get organized. Thanksgiving is a big meal & it can be intimidating, no matter how many times you host. For someone just getting into local, what are your tips on dipping your toe...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:05 Kim ODonnel
10:05
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We order a local turkey, get as many of our veggies local, and even try for local (ish) wine.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:05 Jeanne in Seattle
10:07
Kim ODonnel: 
Jen, as you know, I agree that Thanksgiving is a natural place to start & tap into your local food shed, even with it being such a big meal. I mean, the choices are endless at this time of year: Cranberries (here in the PacNW they're at the farmers' markets!), squash of all kinds, potatoes, beets, celeriac, parsnips, onions, kale, collards...what am I missing?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:07 Kim ODonnel
10:07
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
I'm so grateful my local farmers market is open this weekend (though it is the last weekend :( ) so I can use local stuff for TG.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:07 Lizka
10:08
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Our regular guests include a woman who runs the children's garden for the next door organic gardening organization. They have a zillion kiwi vines, which means kiwis galore for Thanksgiving snacks! From next door.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:08 Jeanne in Seattle
10:08
jen_maiser: 
Many people around the country should be able to get local turkeys, local dairy, local potatoes, local winter squash, and local apples this time of year. The explosion of local and heritage turkeys in the past few years is, I feel, a direct result of folks like us demanding a different turkey. Really glad that Josh and Slow Food have rounded up methods for getting a heritage turkey.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:08 jen_maiser
10:09
Josh Viertel: 
This is my favorite part. First thing I do is determine whether or not you are hosting the whole thing yourself, or whether you are splitting it up, and having a Thanksgiving Potluck. Because I have strong opinions (my loved ones might say, "because you are a control freak") I tend to pair up with a few people who are on the same page. First, figure out where I'm getting the bird, then I make a list of what's in season, figure out the sides, hit the farmers market. Then we tend to divide and conquer with the different dishes. Lots of work can be done a day or two ahead of time. I like to turn preparation into a 2 day party! But it can be easier and quicker too... Josh
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:09 Josh Viertel
10:10
Kim ODonnel: 
Jen, I credit you for opening my eyes a number of years ago to how easy it can be to put on a 100-Mile Thanksgiving. I've been wondering about the turkeys -- so awareness has impacted demand for heritage birds? Josh, what have you seen over the years?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:10 Kim ODonnel
10:10
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
@ Jeanne - that is so cool.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:10 Lizka
10:11
jen_maiser: 
Yes, really curious about the rest of the country, Josh. Is it just my imagination that it's easier to find local(ish) turkeys now than it was in the past few years?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:11 jen_maiser
10:12
Kim ODonnel: 
And if you really want to have fun with it, if an ingredient hasn't been grown or produced in your area, is it owned by a local company? or has it been packaged locally? I'm thinking about coffee, spices, salt...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:12 Kim ODonnel
10:12
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Lizka: I know, right? We are very lucky to be living in Seattle. So much local produce and products readily available. I even get cheese from cows I've met.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:12 Jeanne in Seattle
10:13
Kim ODonnel: 
I do remember when I first started buying a local turkey. Probably 2003. From my farmer-friend Betsy Pritchard who runs a farm with her brother Forrest in Berryville, Virginia. You had to get on that sign-up sheet at least a month in advance!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:13 Kim ODonnel
10:14
jen_maiser: 
One thing that's tricky about Thanksgiving is that families have some dishes that MUST be on the table. But, there are ways to include those dishes but at least try to make them local. Crafty Kim, on her blog a few years ago, made me laugh with an attempt at including local ingredients in their traditional green jello salad. If someone must have the green jello, at least you can add local nuts, local cream. http://kimtimnashville.typepad.com/craftykim/2008/11/dark-days-challenge-a-mostly-local-thanksgiving.html
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:14 jen_maiser
10:14
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kim: the concept of using things packaged by a local company is important, too. In her book The Feast Nearby, Robin Mather talks about buying a packaged cornbread mix that is made in near her home.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:14 Jeanne in Seattle
10:14
Josh Viertel: 
Before 2001 there were only 1200 heritage turkeys in the US. Slow Food worked with other organizations like ALBC, Chefs Collaborative, and the incredible Gary Nabhan to bring them back. We began including the heritage breeds on the Ark of Taste, and in the following 5 years, their population increased by 350%. It keeps on growing. Still, 99.9 percent of turkeys in the US are broad breasted whites, grown in industrial agriculture. THey are mostly breast meat (I prefer the dark meat) and they are so top heavy, they can't even mate on their own!! For folks interested in finding one, check out the guide we put out. www.slowfoodusa.org/thanksgiving2011 There are links that can help you track them down. ALBC is a great resource too. Josh
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:14 Josh Viertel
10:15
Kim ODonnel: 
Josh, this is great info. But still 99.9 percent are big ag turkeys? Wow.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:15 Kim ODonnel
10:16
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne, I'm glad you mentioned The Feast Nearby. Great inspiration for folks looking to bring local food into their daily routines. And if you haven't read Plenty, do so stat! It's a hilarious & touching adventure of a Vancouver couple who went local for a year.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:16 Kim ODonnel
10:16
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
Slow Food in Russian River sent out a message yesterday that it still had 70 (of about 200) heritage turkeys still available. Much more competition in the San Francisco Bay Area local meat arena than 3 years ago.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:16 melanista
10:16
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
my family has some of those funny "must-haves" too. There has to be corn at Thanksgiving. We get creative: I buy corn in summer, cut it off the cobs, and freeze it in vacuum-sealed bags.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:16 Anita
10:17
Josh Viertel: 
If you can't get a heritage bird (in some places they are hard to find, or too expensive for some people's budgets) you can also get a pastured turkey, fed only organic grain, from a small farm. It isn't helping to support a market for heritage breeds, but it is supporting a market we can be proud of...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:17 Josh Viertel
10:17
Josh Viertel: 
Anita, I've got a freezer full of corn put up like that. Never thought to bust it out for thanksgiving though. Hmmn.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:17 Josh Viertel
10:17
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Cheese is the one area I haven't jumped into yet. At my farmers market there is a vender who does cheese, but I'm always trying to be frugal and cheese consistently gets the cut.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:17 Lizka
10:18
jen_maiser: 
And if there's a chance that your family isn't attached to a turkey, you can get creative with other local proteins. Here, it's crab, roast beef, etc.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:18 jen_maiser
10:18
Kim ODonnel: 
Anita, was just thinking about the short season for cranberries. Why must they only be Tgiving, I asked myself? So I have frozen a few extra pounds and plan to either process in jars or bring'em out at Valentine's Day!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:18 Kim ODonnel
10:18
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
Oops, missed the link. 4H raised heritage turkeys from Slow Food - https://app.e2ma.net/app/view:CampaignPublic/id:14087.10908040544/rid:7fae4930a337c6addb095501506980e6
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:18 melanista
10:18
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Anita: that is a fabulous solution!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:18 Jeanne in Seattle
10:18
[Comment From Guest Guest : ] 
My sister really scared me today when she said they would stuff the 20 lb turkey Tuesday night and then cook it Wednesday night. I told her not to do that and would be better to cook stuffing separately. Since she is not a cook she said no we want it cooked inside the turkey. I am not going home for Thanksgiving and I send my blessings that no one gets sick. They love the canned cranberry sauce and seasoning from the box instead of fresh sage and rosemary - guess it's what you like.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:18 Guest
10:19
jen_maiser: 
And, Kim, the great thing about cranberries is they last so long in the fridge. I had some I brought home from Boston last year in the fridge for a month before I did anything with them.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:19 jen_maiser
10:19
Josh Viertel: 
Jen, you are right about that. One of my favorite thanksgivings was in Austria, with a bunch of displaced americans. We couldn't find any turkeys, but we got down with some incredible ducks and geese. Small oily fish (sustainable and affordable) also make great appetizers...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:19 Josh Viertel
10:19
Kim ODonnel: 
There's nothing wrong with stuffing the bird, but do tell sis that she should wait til Wednesday, just before oven time.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:19 Kim ODonnel
10:19
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
Speaking of turkeys and budgets: I was so stunned yesterday when I went to Safeway to get cold medicine and saw they were selling turkeys for 29¢ a pound. I know they're a loss leader to get people in the door, but still. It made me angry.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:19 Anita
10:20
jen_maiser: 
@Josh, I would have loved to be at that Austrian Thanksgiving!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:20 jen_maiser
10:20
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Guest: Stuffing the turkey the night before is a no-no. A room temperature turkey should be stuffed with room temperature stuffing. That way you don't have cold stuffing inside a bird that might not cook well.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:20 Jeanne in Seattle
10:20
[Comment From M M : ] 
Sweet Potato Stew -- nope, not a curry -- but an early Meatless Monday entry. I actually did not follow it to a T -- made some variations to speed it up and otherwise deal with the dental-induced drag on my brain, but here's the original. And thanks again!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:20 M
10:20
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Hi Kim! Hello Jen and Josh! I must give a big shout-out to Kim, who introduced Jen's 100-mile food sourcing to me, way back in the wa-po days. It's been an idea that I've built upon in everyday life, as well as food. Our area also has a Slow Food chapter, which hosts a seasonal dinner once a year to show off some of the riches in our corner of central PA. This year, I'm breaking every personal record I've had in the 100-mile radius with pumpkin pie: made pumpkin puree the day after carving jack o'lanterns from our very own garden pumpkins. Cannot wait to contribute that to the family table. So thank you, all!!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:20 Erin H.
10:20
Josh Viertel: 
Kim is right about that, in my opinion. My favorite way to go with Turkey is to treat it like a Zuni Cafe chicken. Dry it, salt and pepper heavily, and prop it up on a rack uncovered in the fridge for at least 24 hours. I think it beats brine and it beats frying too...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:20 Josh Viertel
10:21
Kim ODonnel: 
Erin, you go girl! That is amazing. Isn't it gratifying?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:21 Kim ODonnel
10:21
[Comment From catsluvr catsluvr : ] 
Yes, I did convince her to stuff it just before roasting when all is room temperature
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:21 catsluvr
10:22
Kim ODonnel: 
Catsluvr, thank goodness! We don't want anyone getting a touch of ye olde food poisoning...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:22 Kim ODonnel
10:22
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
I have never had a stuffing recipe that I enjoyed.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:22 Tarabud
10:22
jen_maiser: 
@Anita, it makes me sad that turkeys are one of the canaries in the coal mine with local food. I mean, heritage turkey costs really show the real cost of sustainability, and the price difference between them and the Safeway loss leader turkeys is astounding.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:22 jen_maiser
10:22
Kim ODonnel: 
Tarabud, is it because it's bland? dry? wet? or just not your thing?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:22 Kim ODonnel
10:22
[Comment From M M : ] 
oh, ARGH. HERE is the link BEFORE I hit the Return key. Doh! http://trueslant.com/kimodonnel/2009/10/26/meatless-monday-peanut-butter-hearts-sweet-potato/
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:22 M
10:22
Kim ODonnel: 
Thanks M, three times' a charm...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:22 Kim ODonnel
10:23
Josh Viertel: 
Jen, it was pretty great. The Austrians love pumpkin (particularly for the oil from the seeds), and they love pies (particularly apple) but they couldn't imagine making a pumpkin pie. They tried, but they basically just made an apple pie but substituted pumpkin for apple. It was, as they say in the mid-west "different".
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:23 Josh Viertel
10:23
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I am not a fan of sweet potatoes (they just don't do it for me). And one of my guests is allergic to them. So, we do a butternut squash soup as an appetizer. Everyone likes it--even the kids.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:23 Jeanne in Seattle
10:23
jen_maiser: 
Hi, Erin. Wish I could be in PA for your Thanksgiving!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:23 jen_maiser
10:23
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Thank you, M! Much appreciated.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:23 Lizka
10:23
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
@Tarabud I will humbly offer up my grandma's stuffing recipe. Many of my friends have adopted it: http://marriedwithdinner.com/2009/11/24/great-grandmas-turkey-stuffing/
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:23 Anita
10:23
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Kim, with a little planning, a lot is possible. Very grateful to have the resources and encouragement from a diverse set of friends and farmers, including this chat (naturally!).
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:23 Erin H.
10:24
jen_maiser: 
Speaking of pumpkin seeds, Heidi had an interesting post on 101 cookbooks this week that talked about using delicata squash seeds in a salad. I thought that was brilliant. Did anyone see? http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/ginger-soba-noodles-recipe.html
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:24 jen_maiser
10:24
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
I did butternut squash soup 1x.... thanks @Anita!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:24 Tarabud
10:24
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
one tip my cousin gave me is that stuffing that won't fit in the bird cooks much better in a CrockPot than in a casserole -- it stays moist, almost as good as inside the turkey. and it saves space in the oven for side dishes.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:24 Anita
10:25
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Josh, great idea to serve small oily fish, e.g., sardines, anchovies, mackerel as a starter. Here's a piece on how to prep. http://www.grist.org/sustainable-food/2011-11-15-chow-to-clean-sardines
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:25 melanista
10:25
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Ooo, Anita--so fun. Will check it out. We also use a family stuffing recipe. Years ago, I was open to branching out, but my husband and friends love it so much that we just kept going with it. Tradition is delicious!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:25 Jeanne in Seattle
10:26
Kim ODonnel: 
Tradition is delicious. That's a motto to hold onto. So what are some of your Thanksgiving traditions?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:26 Kim ODonnel
10:26
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Saving seeds from the squashes (palm meet forehead) - why has this never occurred to me? Thanks Jen.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:26 Lizka
10:26
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Soup was delicious, but will need to space out serving time between courses next time.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:26 Tarabud
10:26
jen_maiser: 
@lizka right? it hadn't occurred to me, either.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:26 jen_maiser
10:27
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
@melanista Thanks for this idea on starters.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:27 Tarabud
10:27
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Anita, grandma's stuffing recipe looks great. Another tip when cooking the dressing/stuffing outside the bird is to be sure to add some extra fat (butter or drippings) and broth to give it that steamy moistness.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:27 melanista
10:27
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I bake my pumpkin pie in the toaster oven. And, I plan side dishes that go in the oven that need the same temp. as the turkey.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:27 Jeanne in Seattle
10:27
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Jen, you've hit the nail on the head (cost comparison) of why so many people still scoff at the notion of locally-sourced or heritage birds. It is definitely difficult to argue the bottom line comparison; however, one way of looking at it - keeping most, if not all, of the cost in the local economy by purchasing a local bird (to say nothing of the potential savings in health costs later on, say) - is one way to gently start changing the conversation and habits. Of course, this all goes hand-in-hand with consuming less meat, and higher quality of meat when we do. But it takes a lot of getting used to. P.S. Jen, I'll set you a place; you're welcome at any time.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:27 Erin H.
10:28
Josh Viertel: 
Kim, my thanksgiving tradition is to get into drawn out debates with my uncle, who consults for Monsanto and Bayer on their GMO and agriculture programs... I always say that the table can teach us to disagree with someone and still love them. For me, this is the ultimate test!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:28 Josh Viertel
10:28
Kim ODonnel: 
Hilarious! And is said debate done over copious amounts of wine??
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:28 Kim ODonnel
10:28
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
LOL, Josh! Good luck!!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:28 Erin H.
10:28
jen_maiser: 
@Josh, I can't even imagine that Thanksgiving conversation. Wow.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:28 jen_maiser
10:29
Josh Viertel: 
We've done copious wine. But our other tradition is mulled cider with bourbon. I'm astounded we have never drawn the police...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:29 Josh Viertel
10:29
Kim ODonnel: 
I always make the cranberries. That's my thing & I don't budge. Not because it's better than anyone else's version but that I love having the stash in the fridge & I love the smell. It takes me into the past. I also like to have an early morning yoga practice & a cup of coffee by myself.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:29 Kim ODonnel
10:29
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
I'm having to take deep breaths just thinking of Josh's debates with his uncle. Now I have something extra to be thankful for -- that I don't have to argue with anyone on Thanksgiving. :)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:29 Anita
10:30
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
@josh Good work on the interpersonal challenges!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:30 Tarabud
10:30
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
mulled cider with bourbon @josh yum. Any recipe?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:30 Tarabud
10:30
Josh Viertel: 
Is it still thanksgiving if you don't argue with someone? ;-)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:30 Josh Viertel
10:30
jen_maiser: 
I'm a bit of a nomad at Thanksgiving, switching between going to Southern California to celebrate with my family, or dining up here with friends. This year, I've squirreled my way into an invitation with friends who are so prepared that they have already run through all recipes once! These are friends who made me deep fried bone marrow for dinner one night. So, needless to say, I cannot wait.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:30 jen_maiser
10:30
Kim ODonnel: 
I LOVE The idea of mulled cider with bourbon!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:30 Kim ODonnel
10:30
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kim: Yes to the homemade cranberries! I just like making them. And they smell so good.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:30 Jeanne in Seattle
10:31
Kim ODonnel: 
My husband's from Kentucky, so he prefers a cornbread stuffing (which he calls 'dressing'). Since we've been together, it's become his 'thing' -- and I'm thrilled he wants to contribute to the menu...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:31 Kim ODonnel
10:31
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Our tradition: the Clean Up Crew (i.e. women) do shots in the kitchen and help ourselves to dessert seconds once the last dish is washed/dried.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:31 Erin H.
10:32
Kim ODonnel: 
Oh, I want to be a fly on the wall in your house, Erin.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:32 Kim ODonnel
10:32
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Cranberries are one of my must-haves too.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:32 Lizka
10:32
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Josh, but other families fight about football. :-)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:32 melanista
10:33
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
No fights in our house, just Tarot card readings when the night gets late. :) Good to know artist and visionaries for the holidays. We have orphans, who don't have a place a to go.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:33 Tarabud
10:33
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
@ Erin - what a great tradition!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:33 Lizka
10:33
Josh Viertel: 
Tarabud, sure. It is just in my head, no measurements, but you'll get the idea. Good cider (1-5 gallons, depending on the crowd). Cinnamon sticks. an orange or two, with a bunch of cloves pressed into the oranges (good job for kids), then cut in half. If I remembered to can peaches, I drop a jar of them in there, with the syrup. Some mace. Some black peppercorns. A dried hot pepper or two. Bring to a boil. Drop to a simmer. Serve with bourbon. We leave it on the stove at a low simmer with a bottle of bourbon and one of rum. I never understand the people who choose the rum, but some people do. (You know, the kind of people who consult for monsanto...)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:33 Josh Viertel
10:34
Kim ODonnel: 
Who else grew up with Stove Top stuffing & Parker House rolls on the Thanksgiving table? When I was in college, I noticed just how processed our Thanksgiving was year after year, and slowly, every year, I started incorporating a homemade element to the meal...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:34 Kim ODonnel
10:34
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
@Josh awesome, thanks for sharing my husband will love this! :)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:34 Tarabud
10:34
Josh Viertel: 
Also, if you want more recipes, check out the Slow Food Thanksgiving guide. There are some good ones in there... http://bit.ly/vJibqG
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:34 Josh Viertel
10:35
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
My childhood nightmare: the dreaded sweet potato stuff with the marshmallows on top. eewww...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:35 Erin H.
10:35
Kim ODonnel: 
And there's the string bean casserole, which was essentially an ad for Campbell's Soup. Been around for 1955.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:35 Kim ODonnel
10:35
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
Mmmm, Parker House rolls seem to have disappeared from the current vernacular. We should start a movement to revive them.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:35 melanista
10:35
Josh Viertel: 
Kim, We didn't have stove top stuffing, but we always made stuffing from scratch. OUT OF WONDERBREAD. Strange no? Also, I must admit, it is still my favorite part when I have thanksgiving with my family...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:35 Josh Viertel
10:36
Kim ODonnel: 
Melanista, I made my own a few years ago. Stand by, let me see if I can dig up a link.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:36 Kim ODonnel
10:37
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kim: we had Stovetop stuffing at other times, for a side dish, but not on Thanksgiving. That was always homemade. And homemade Parker House rolls!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Jeanne in Seattle
10:37
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Erin H.: I am with you. The marshmallows were so gross. And no one ate it. But my mom insisted.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Jeanne in Seattle
10:37
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
@melanista Shuna Lydon's recipe for Parker House rolls is awesome: http://www.starchefs.com/cook/recipe/parker-house-rolls
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Anita
10:37
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
My family immigrated from Colombia, so there was never actually a Turkey. My husband grew up with a turkey so now I am a traditionalist like him. I enjoy cooking this special meal.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Tarabud
10:37
jen_maiser: 
My 92-year old grandmother, who hardly cooks anymore, still makes our family's yams glazed with an orange glaze that I love. I love eating them the next morning, cold, with milk. Mmmm. So thankful that is our tradition, not the marshmallow yams.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 jen_maiser
10:37
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Thanks for the mulled recipe, Josh.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Lizka
10:37
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
My present nightmare: "candied" yams. eewwww...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Erin H.
10:37
Kim ODonnel: 
Erin, who makes those yams?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:37 Kim ODonnel
10:38
[Comment From catsluvr catsluvr : ] 
Ours was processed also and no one but me pays attention to the revolution in food so the processed Thanks goes on. They are happy to get a free turkey with their groceries and have already bought the canned cranberry sauce because it was on sale. Sweet potatoes will be layered and doused with syrup, butter and brown sugar and then topped with marshmallows. I usually have holiday dinners at home with friends and this year with my daughter in NC. I find that being with the family is more important than the food at holiday time and we do have lots of fun.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:38 catsluvr
10:38
Kim ODonnel: 
Catsluvr, you make a great point. We cannot underestimate the value of gathering at the table with the people we love.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:38 Kim ODonnel
10:38
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
My FIL: canned sweet potatoes dumped in a big cast iron pan with a stick of butter and two cups of brown sugar. Cook. Candy. Serve. *retch*
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:38 Erin H.
10:38
Josh Viertel: 
Erin, I just caught your clean up crew story. That sounds like the place to be. But the yams and marshmallows, that was a hit with the kids... I tried switching to a Paul Prudhomme yam recipe one year, and my cousins nearly dropped me in the turkey fryer. They wanted their marshmallows...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:38 Josh Viertel
10:39
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
yay for cast iron!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 Tarabud
10:39
jen_maiser: 
@catsluvr, you have a good attitude about it. It's really critical (to me) not to nitpick the food to death. Just to do the best I can, and try to make small differences slowly.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 jen_maiser
10:39
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
If anyone is interested, I have a gluten-free Parker House roll recipe on my site. I adapted my mom's recipe. http://www.artofglutenfreebaking.com/2009/11/dinner-rolls-gluten-free-revised-22810/
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 Jeanne in Seattle
10:39
Kim ODonnel: 
I can vouch for Jeanne's GF yumminess...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 Kim ODonnel
10:39
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
To each their own, Josh. The marshmallows were not for me, sadly.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 Erin H.
10:39
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
@ Erin - when I started doing TG myself, I did one of those overly sweetened sweet potato recipes b/c that's the ideal (right? ;) ). Once was enough for me.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 Lizka
10:39
[Comment From catsluvr catsluvr : ] 
Amen!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:39 catsluvr
10:40
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Anita, thanks, I was just thinking that Shuna had shared her recipe. And in Oakland, Taste of Denmark still makes them.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:40 melanista
10:41
jen_maiser: 
By the way, I posted a round up of some old eat local Thanksgiving posts from around the country this morning on the Eat Local Challenge site in case anyone needs inspiration: http://www.eatlocalchallenge.com/2011/11/eating-locally-at-thanksgiving.html
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:41 jen_maiser
10:41
Kim ODonnel: 
Oh Jen, thanks for adding this. Good stuff. One crumb at a time, folks can do local...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:41 Kim ODonnel
10:41
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
I wouldn't get near yams, ever... until one Thanksgiving my mother made a savory whipped yam with caramelized apples. THAT changed my outlook forever: gimme my sweet 'taters savory, please. :)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:41 Erin H.
10:42
Josh Viertel: 
I have a question for all: Does anyone think about salad on thanksgiving? If it hasn't frozen hard, it is maybe my favorite time of year for salad. Escarole, frisee, radicchio, puntarelle (these are my FAVORITES, but you gotta grow em. hard to find) http://www.theproducehunter.com/productdisplay.asp?ID=2228 The salads get sweet and bitter, and they cut through all rich stuff. Thanksgiving is a time for salad. Particularly if you've got a garden, and a touch for season extension...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:42 Josh Viertel
10:42
Kim ODonnel: 
Interesting you ask that, Josh. One of my guests, who's a dear friend, always brings the salad. And we're very grateful for it!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:42 Kim ODonnel
10:43
jen_maiser: 
@Erin, I'm with you. I really don't want sweet stuff in my entrees, ever. It's kind of a problem. But somehow, I always have room for my grandmother's candied yams -- it's like my one exception. That savory yam idea sounds amazing.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 jen_maiser
10:43
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Erin H: Yes! Sweet potatoes,savory, is my thing, too!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 Jeanne in Seattle
10:43
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
(Sorry, I'm using "yam" and "sweet potato" interchangeably. I mean "yam," technically, in all cases.)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 Erin H.
10:43
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Hoping my vegetables from Grand Lake Farmers Market stay fresh until Thursday. Gonna try brussel sprouts and bacon recipe I just discovered from @savorysweetlife
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 Tarabud
10:43
Kim ODonnel: 
Tarabud, Grand Lake market is still open?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 Kim ODonnel
10:43
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Josh: I love salad at Thanksgiving. And we also have a lightly sauteed kale dish that includes nuts and pomegranate seeds. Delish!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 Jeanne in Seattle
10:43
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Good idea about cutting through all the heavy stuff with salad. I never thought of it, but it's good - I'll keep my eyes open at the farmers market this weekend.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:43 Lizka
10:44
jen_maiser: 
@Josh, I just adore when there's a salad on the Thanksgiving table. You're right ... it's really refreshing as opposed to the rest of the richness.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:44 jen_maiser
10:44
Kim ODonnel: 
And there's great seasonal fruit that can be throw in: persimmons, quince, pears, satsumas, pomegranate...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:44 Kim ODonnel
10:44
jen_maiser: 
What does everyone do for dessert? I don't understand the people who don't have pumpkin pie. It's my one *must have* for Thanksgiving, and is pretty possible to make locally.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:44 jen_maiser
10:44
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
One new dish that has found its way onto our T-day table is Afghani kaddo bourani. We already made it for Halloween with a heirloom pumpkin grown by Mariquita Farms. Here's the old recipe (the newer ones use less sugar, but try it first with full throttle). http://articles.sfgate.com/1998-10-28/food/17733779_1_diced-pumpkin-pumpkin-dishes-pumpkin-ravioli
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:44 melanista
10:45
Kim ODonnel: 
Oh, Melanista, thanks for this! There's no such thing as too many squash recipes, in my opinion.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:45 Kim ODonnel
10:45
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
@josh we have shaved Brussels sprouts with bacon. that's as close to salad as we get :D
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:45 Anita
10:45
jen_maiser: 
@melanista, thanks so much for posting that. I adore The Helmand's kaddo.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:45 jen_maiser
10:45
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I have to admit, I love having a zillion veggies at Thanksgiving, along with the turkey and stuffing. I'm not a huge potato fan. Rice is my more favored side starch.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:45 Jeanne in Seattle
10:46
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
But I would be thrown in the oven if didn't make mashed potatoes for everyone!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:46 Jeanne in Seattle
10:46
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
I do think about salad! When I mentally picture a thanksgiving plate, it's mostly shades of beige: gravy, potatoes, turkey, stuffing... sometimes there is a green vegetable, but there could - SHOULD - be more. I am bringing a salad to this year, just a green one, unfortunately not local. But it will be mostly arugala for the peppery bite to balance out the heavier things on the plate. maybe with some citrus... hmmm...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:46 Erin H.
10:46
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Love the pumpkin pie, Must have with my people. Also, freshly whipped cream is easy now with technology! Who would have thought you don't have to let arm fall off!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:46 Tarabud
10:46
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We have pumpkin pie, apple pie, and a chocolate cake. That way everyone is happy!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:46 Jeanne in Seattle
10:46
Josh Viertel: 
Love the kale recipe Jeanne... Another is brussels sprouts, shaved thin. If it is going to be sweet as an entree or side, I want the sweet to come from the season. Like the sweetness that develops in greens after frost, or in carrots or parsnips once it freezes... I'm also a big fan of the fruit this time of year, but it is hard in the northeast...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:46 Josh Viertel
10:46
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I also sometimes make a meringue ice cream recipe that I adapted from Julia Child. It is so good, people are floored by it.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:46 Jeanne in Seattle
10:47
Kim ODonnel: 
Josh, those shaved thin Brussels are superb with thinly sliced apples...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:47 Kim ODonnel
10:47
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
What about wine? Today's Beaujolais Noveau day, so it always gets discussed as a pairing with turkey. But for me, California's grape - Zinfandel! So great with the many flavors on the table, especially yams and pumpkin.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:47 melanista
10:47
jen_maiser: 
I adore brussels sprouts at Thanksgiving, but I'm in the minority with my family. My cousins actually asked my mom to never bring brussels sprouts to a family event again! And she makes them fantastically, shredded and sauteed.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:47 jen_maiser
10:47
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
@kim do think Pears would work with brussel sprouts? Must do the shaved thin!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:47 Tarabud
10:48
Kim ODonnel: 
Tarabud, I do. A crisp pear, though. Maybe an Asian pear?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:48 Kim ODonnel
10:48
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
@melanista we're big Pinot Noir fans in our house, but Zins make an appearance now and then.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:48 Anita
10:48
Josh Viertel: 
That is a GREAT idea Kim. Hadn't thought of that. I've done it with reggiano olive oil and lemon, but the apples just changed everything... Asian pear would be great too. Needs some acid though...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:48 Josh Viertel
10:49
Kim ODonnel: 
A spritz of lemon or orange will do ya in that salad. And chopped pecans or walnuts at the end. Salad of champions.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:49 Kim ODonnel
10:49
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
I've learned with my family that I should make a small quantity of something if it is not the "traditional" fare; brussel sprouts in any fashion would fit that bill. Yum. And for turkey, I always bring a Pino Grigio...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:49 Erin H.
10:49
Josh Viertel: 
Salad of Champions indeed. I think I'm going to change up our menu. Thank you.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:49 Josh Viertel
10:50
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Jen: I'm with you on the brussels sprouts! I make them diced and sauteed with garlic, shallots, and herbs. Our family loves them, but the family we have for Tgiving dinner doesn't--so we don't make it for that day.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:50 Jeanne in Seattle
10:50
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I love the tradition element to Beaujolais! But, Zinfandel is definitely a terrific option. We usually have several red wines with the dinner.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:50 Jeanne in Seattle
10:50
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
I don't know if Asian pear would be grown local? hmmm
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:50 Tarabud
10:50
jen_maiser: 
I'm a big fan of sparkling wines at Thanksgiving. And there are so many local beers available now that I'm wondering if any would work at the Thanksgiving day table.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:50 jen_maiser
10:50
Kim ODonnel: 
Or what about a Bosc pear not quite ripe?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:50 Kim ODonnel
10:50
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@anita, I drink more Pinot Noir than anything else as well. The most food friendly of wines. But for the American holiday, I pull out Zin. And don't forget bubbles!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:50 melanista
10:51
Kim ODonnel: 
Bubbles. Yes, my crew will want some of those. And if you want to make them American, Gruet from New Mexico is one fine value...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:51 Kim ODonnel
10:51
Josh Viertel: 
We get great locally grown asian pears. There is a wonderful fruit grower who comes to the brooklyn farmers market, and I always stop and chat, and learn about heritage apple varieties...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:51 Josh Viertel
10:51
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
I think beer with turkey sounds perfect.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:51 Lizka
10:51
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Jen, I think a fruity hard-cider would be lovely too.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:51 melanista
10:51
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Brussels that I will modify http://www.pbs.org/parents/kitchenexplorers/2011/11/17/brussel-sprouts-with-bacon-maple-vinaigrette/
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:51 Tarabud
10:51
[Comment From Kathryn Yeomans Kathryn Yeomans : ] 
I had a wonderful rose at the Portland Farmers Market that I think would cut through all the heavy, and compliment with light fruit & clean acidity.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:51 Kathryn Yeomans
10:52
Kim ODonnel: 
Rose. Yes! Great for turkey & trimmings. Thank you, Kathryn. I knew I was forgetting something. I also like Syrah with the feast.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:52 Kim ODonnel
10:52
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Kim, love Gruet. And for those on the East Coast who want to drink local, try Westport Rivers sparkling wines.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:52 melanista
10:52
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Jen, when I first looked at your 100-mile challenge, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that the Yuengling Brewery was within my radius. My life could go on ('Hey! It's LOCAL!').
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:52 Erin H.
10:52
jen_maiser: 
Here in San Francisco, we have great Roederer sparklings from Anderson Valley, and some delicious Russian River pinot noirs. The beers I'm thinking of would be light, slightly sour, crisp.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:52 jen_maiser
10:52
Josh Viertel: 
My favorite bubbles come from a friend who makes hard, champaign style cider out of a whole mess of different apple varieties...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:52 Josh Viertel
10:52
Kim ODonnel: 
Erin, Yuengling is part of my young adulthood. It's what we drank at the neighborhood bar outside of Philly.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:52 Kim ODonnel
10:53
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Love Anderson Valley wines! delish!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:53 Tarabud
10:53
jen_maiser: 
@erin, local beer is key! so glad you found that.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:53 jen_maiser
10:53
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Feeling a little jealous of the PNW'ers and CA's who have such amazing vineyards at their fingertips!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:53 Erin H.
10:53
Kim ODonnel: 
How about snacks/ apps? Who's doing what this year? I need some inspiration.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:53 Kim ODonnel
10:54
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
@Erin we are so spoiled and I am so Thankful.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 Tarabud
10:54
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Jen: Ooo, Roederer is one of my favorites1
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 Jeanne in Seattle
10:54
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
And fabulous meads from Arcata (Humboldt County)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 melanista
10:54
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I usually make a baked olives and feta app that folks love with crackers.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 Jeanne in Seattle
10:54
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Good heavens, no snacks/apps. Here, this year, the snacks/apps are called "breakfast." (We're dining at 1PM.)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 Erin H.
10:54
Kim ODonnel: 
Erin, we'll be lucky here if we pull off dinner at 4...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 Kim ODonnel
10:54
[Comment From Kathryn Yeomans Kathryn Yeomans : ] 
I always make a truffled turkey liver pate - though this year, the truffles might be a little late. We'll have to do with just brandy, shallots, & thyme.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:54 Kathryn Yeomans
10:55
jen_maiser: 
@Kathryn that sounds *fantastic*. Do you by chance have a recipe?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:55 jen_maiser
10:55
Josh Viertel: 
Erin, and Jen, When I was working to change purchasing for Yale University's dining services, one of the pruchasers tried to convince me that a certain brand of hotdogs was a local product because the hotdog factory was down the road in an industrial zone outside of new haven... Too funny. This is the trick w/ local. UNC chapel hill claimed to have local pork. It was local in a sense, from Smithfield, the largest industrial pork producer out there... Ah...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:55 Josh Viertel
10:55
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Highly recommend Ridge http://www.ridgewine.com/wines/
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:55 Tarabud
10:56
Kim ODonnel: 
Josh, I'm glad you brought that up. And if folks are feeling overwhelmed, pick one ingredient or dish at a time to go local. Then next time, add one more...and so on.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:56 Kim ODonnel
10:56
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
@Kathryn, love that idea to use up the liver.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:56 melanista
10:57
Kim ODonnel: 
That's my kind of eating down the fridge. Speaking of which, favorite ways to repurpose Tgiving leftovers?
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:57 Kim ODonnel
10:57
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
We do things quite leisurely. Folks are asked to arrive around 4. Which means usually 5ish. And then we chat and they do final touches to what they bring. So, there is a fair amount of time for snacks before dinner!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:57 Jeanne in Seattle
10:57
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I use the giblets for stock for the gravy. Shhh. Don't tell the kids.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:57 Jeanne in Seattle
10:57
[Comment From melanista melanista : ] 
The mead producer is Heidrun. http://www.heidrunmeadery.com/ In particular, I think the sage blossom honey mead will be great on the Thanksgiving table.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:57 melanista
10:58
jen_maiser: 
@Josh and Erin, you bring up a good point. I've been playing around with the idea of "If it's not local to you, it should be local to somewhere." In my mind, Smithfield is not local to anywhere. I would much rather support a sustainable pork farmer from far away with an important story than a local mass-produced meat producer. We have the same issue with Foster Farms which is, in a sense, nearby but I don't consider it a good option.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:58 jen_maiser
10:58
Josh Viertel: 
Kim, I think you are right on. My favorite way to do it is to go to a local market (or my garden, if I'm lucky enough to have on), and let that guide my thinking about what to plan for dinner. I can't really start with the recipe and find the ingredients. I find the ingredients, then build the recipe around it... I find everything tastes better that way! (And it just somehow tends to work out.)
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:58 Josh Viertel
10:58
Kim ODonnel: 
Josh & Jen, please let folks know how they can get in touch, see your handiwork, before we sign off...and perhaps we should consider a local New Year's chat?! How to celebrate the New Year (or start off the New Year) locally...
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:58 Kim ODonnel
10:59
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Josh, I understand and know those tricks. In my past life, I did a lot of building material sourcing research; same kinds of thing when talking about the raw material and the location of the manufacturing of the final product. Now, I have a "Buy Fresh, Buy Local" sticker on my car and routinely get into discussions with my neighbor because I never shopped at his corner store: nothing in there was local (though, if I had a need for Doritos, I *would* rather purchase from a local business instead of a large, W*l-M*rt place).
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 Erin H.
10:59
Josh Viertel: 
Jen, I think this is a great way to think about it. Odessa Piper (one of my heroes) says "If its not local, it should have a locale!"
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 Josh Viertel
10:59
[Comment From Lizka Lizka : ] 
Thanks so much to all for an amazing chat - lots of great info and ideas. A Happy and Healthy Thanksgiving to all.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 Lizka
10:59
jen_maiser: 
LOVE that quote. Thanks for mentioning.
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 jen_maiser
10:59
Kim ODonnel: 
Lizka, thanks for stopping by!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 Kim ODonnel
10:59
[Comment From Kathryn Yeomans Kathryn Yeomans : ] 
@ jen_maiser - just get a skillet very hot with butter, then sear the liver medium-rare, tying to get both sides nice & brown. Remove the liver to a plate, turn down the heat, add chopped shallots to the pan, let them saute a minute, add fresh thyme, then de-glaze the pan with brandy or cognac, and if you dare, ignite the brandy (watch your eyelashes!). Add the livers and all that is in the pan to a food processor, then season with salt & pepper & puree...with truffle butter (softened butter blended with fresh truffles).
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 Kathryn Yeomans
10:59
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Josh and Jen: Thank you so much for a terrific chat! And Kim, it was wonderful, as always!!
Thursday November 17, 2011 10:59 Jeanne in Seattle
11:00
jen_maiser: 
Thanks so much for inviting me, this was fun. I can't believe I didn't eat breakfast before this because you all have me starving now for pumpkin pie. You can reach me at the Eat Local Challenge blog: http://www.eatlocalchallenge.com/ or the ELC facebook page, or @jenmaiser on twitter.
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:00 jen_maiser
11:00
[Comment From M M : ] 
Both of us grew up with large, boisterous family Thanksgivings. But for the past few years, we've had a new "tradition" that we really have come to enjoy -- a full Thanksgiving dinner for just the two of us. I start the day with coffee and oatmeal with apples (and cinnamon, some quite "me" time (like Kim, yoga helps establish a peaceful mindset for the day). Then we ease into the day. Just the things we like, as we like time, slow snacks at midday, early bottle of wine (!), no arguments. It really is lovely. We arrange time with families in the weeks prior and following, but this is really restful for us. Especially so since my husband works in retail mgt. and the word gets crazy for the next several weeks. We've been lucky so far that he's had T-day off for the past few years. In a way, we are reclaiming a "family" holiday since there is so much pressure now for stores to be open all day every day and so few people seem to understand that all those workers are not just machines but real people...
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:00 M
11:00
Josh Viertel: 
It was a real pleasure. Thank you all. The best part of my day. I wish I were having you all to thanksgiving!!
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:00 Josh Viertel
11:01
jen_maiser: 
Thanks for the recipe, Kathryn. Can't wait to try it.
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:01 jen_maiser
11:01
[Comment From Erin H. Erin H. : ] 
Lovely to reconnect and get the saliva flowing with this chat! Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:01 Erin H.
11:01
[Comment From Anita Anita : ] 
Thanks, Josh, Jen, and Kim!
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:01 Anita
11:01
[Comment From Tarabud Tarabud : ] 
Like wise to everyone for lovely Thanksgiving and local organic save the planet talk. You can find me at http://foodieoutofthecloset.blogspot.com/
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:01 Tarabud
11:02
Kim ODonnel: 
Thank you all -- and a big huzzah to Josh Viertel and Jennifer Maiser for taking the time to chat. Here's to a safe and delicious Thanksgiving. And my gratitude for your insight and food for thought. All best.
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:02 Kim ODonnel
11:02
Josh Viertel: 
M, your tradition is an inspiration. We all deserve that. I hope we can find a way to do that every week.
Thursday November 17, 2011 11:02 Josh Viertel
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Table Talk

Kim O’Donnel is a trained chef, nationally recognized online food personality, and a longtime journalist. She is the author of a new cookbook, The Meat Lover’s Meatless Cookbook.

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