Table Talk: September 15

Can you can?

By
September 1, 2011

(Editor’s note: This chat is over, but the transcript is available to read here. And join Kim for another Table Talk soon.)

After a long and chatless summer, we’re thrilled to have Kim O’Donnel back for a live online hour of advice and entertainment on Thursday, September 15, at 10 a.m. PT, 1 p.m. ET.

The topic is preserving, and the guest list is impressive: Marisa McClellan, author of the forthcoming Food in Jars (May 2012) and proprietor of the blog of the same name; Sarah B. Hood, author of the recently released We Sure Can; and Sean Timberlake of Punk Domestics.

All will join Kim, who’s been busy with her own canning evangelicalism: the Can-It-Forward weekend in August, by the Canning Across America group she founded.

Pickles ‘n’ jam.

So bring your questions, preserving stories, and recipes to Kim and company on September 15, right here. See you then!

Kim O’Donnel, a trained chef and cookbook author, hosts chats frequently, right here. You can always check the Table Talk page to see when the next chat will take place.


 Table Talk with Kim O'Donnel - Sept. 15, 2011(09/15/2011) 
9:41
Kim ODonnel: 
A canning roundtable with a crackerjack panel of preservers, coming up at the top of the hour...
Thursday September 15, 2011 9:41 Kim ODonnel
10:00
Kim ODonnel: 
Hello out there! Last time we typed, the summer was just kicking up; now we're ushering in fall. For our reunion, I've got something special today -- an all-star lineup of preservers: Sean Timberlake of Punk Domestics; Marisa McClellan of Food in Jars; and Sarah B. Hood, author of the newly minted We Sure Can! These folks would tell you that there's always something to put up, but I know they'd agree that September is preserving's pay dirt. There is just so much to put away in jars, freeze, ferment and dry! For the next hour, we'll take your questions and comments about anything under the preserving sun. No question is too simple or stupid; we want to hear from you, regardless of experience and/or skill. I never get tired of saying this, but you CAN do it! Ok, let's roll...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:00 Kim ODonnel
10:00
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
Just putting an early word in for high altitude canning instructions -- either at the top of the convo, or interspersed.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:00 cdthomas
10:01
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
Also, where are apricots still in season? They vanished in CO around mid-August.... makes reading recipes using fresh ones most frustrating.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:01 cdthomas
10:02
Sean Timberlake: 
@cdthomas I think there may still be a few here in the Bay Area, but they're definitely past their peak
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:02 Sean Timberlake
10:02
Sarah B. Hood: 
Sarah here, better late than never.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:02 Sarah B. Hood
10:02
[Comment From Kai Kai : ] 
So happy to see this forum. I've been trying to figure out how to preserve my caramel sauce. I'd like to do it in jars that have a single piece top as you see in stores so I may sell it and have it look more professional than Kerr or Ball jars. It contains butter, cream, sugar, vanilla and a few other natural ingredients depending on the flavor. When I water-bath can or pressure can it, the contents boil and separate. Is it safe to simply hot pack it and allow the air to escape during cooling, thus creating a tight and safe seal? It seems to work and so far I've not seen a problem with it, but want to be sure. I'd like to have it be shelf stable and not need refrigeration. No literature I've seen mentions how to do this for fear of botulism. Wouldn't the extreme amount of sugar create a non-hostile environment? How do the pros do it???
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:02 Kai
10:02
Marisa McClellan: 
cdthomas, I've found that the best resource for information on high altitude canning comes from the National Center for Home Food Preservation. They have information on how to find your altitude and how to adjust for it.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:02 Marisa McClellan
10:02
[Comment From Deb Krause Deb Krause : ] 
Hi! from Edmonton Alberta Canada.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:02 Deb Krause
10:03
Marisa McClellan: 
Here's the link to the NCHFP website. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:03 Marisa McClellan
10:03
Kim ODonnel: 
Hellooooo Edmonton! Glad to see some Canadian representation (other than Miss Sarah, of course...)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:03 Kim ODonnel
10:03
[Comment From KarenMc KarenMc : ] 
Hi and thanks for the welcome. no apricots here in NC
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:03 KarenMc
10:03
[Comment From Carrie Oliver Carrie Oliver : ] 
Greetings from Toronto. Never canned/preserved before but have friend overwhelmed with tomatoes and offered to "help" :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:03 Carrie Oliver
10:03
Sean Timberlake: 
Hi Carrie!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:03 Sean Timberlake
10:03
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Hi guys! So glad to be here!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:03 Jeanne in Seattle
10:04
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne is one of my Canning Across America comrades & she was a big part of National Can-It-Forward Day here in Seattle.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:04 Kim ODonnel
10:04
[Comment From Deb Krause Deb Krause : ] 
I'm interested in canning roasted red peppers.. do they need to be cooked with a ton of vinegar to preserve properly?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:04 Deb Krause
10:04
Marisa McClellan: 
As far as the apricots go, I think they're done now here too. It's hard to manage the end of the season with a canning blog, because you've made something great and want to share, but then the main ingredients drifts out of season before you're able to get it posted.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:04 Marisa McClellan
10:05
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
Indians are big in oil-based pickles. Cayenne and turmeric are bog spices in canning as well as mustard oil - is it possible to can, using the water boiling method, green tomatoes that are finely chopped and cooked in large amounts of cayenne, turmeric, salt, and oil? If so, is there any additional agents that need to be added to make it safe? Thanks for this discussion
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:05 Raghavan Iyer
10:05
Marisa McClellan: 
Deb, Shae from Hitchhiking to Heaven has a good post on canning roasted peppers. http://hitchhikingtoheaven.com/2010/10/pimientos-rojos-marinated-roasted-red-peppers.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:05 Marisa McClellan
10:06
Sean Timberlake: 
Deb, red peppers are a low-acid vegetable, and do need to be acidified to be safely canned in a water bath canner. Marisa beat me to the link. :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:06 Sean Timberlake
10:06
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey Raghavan! Tickled to have you join us. Re: green tomatoes: I think you may need to pressure can these, but let's get the 411 from the panel...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:06 Kim ODonnel
10:06
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
Howdy from the rainy, rainy Hudson Valley!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:06 Kaela
10:06
Kim ODonnel: 
Greetings, Kaela! What are you putting up lately?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:06 Kim ODonnel
10:06
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
I know -- just jealous...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:06 cdthomas
10:07
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
@Marisa and Sean, thx so much! the one recipe i found only called for a small amount that i didn't think would work...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:07 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:07
Marisa McClellan: 
Kai, all the research I've done has indicated that there's no USDA-approved way to safely can caramel sauce.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:07 Marisa McClellan
10:07
Sean Timberlake: 
Raghavan, the USDA does not endorse water bath canning any oil-based pickles. Many of us have discussed various traditions including Indian pickles, but there's no safe tested method.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:07 Sean Timberlake
10:07
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
I'm staring at 35+ pounds on tomatoes on my kitchen counter. Ketchup in progress, red salsa, more tomato sauce on the way!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:07 Kaela
10:07
Sean Timberlake: 
Rock on, Kaela!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:07 Sean Timberlake
10:08
Kim ODonnel: 
Kaela, go on with your bad self. I'm going to put up a box of maters tomorrow w/ my canning partner Miz Jeanne.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:08 Kim ODonnel
10:08
[Comment From Carrie Oliver Carrie Oliver : ] 
Here's my question. As a complete newbie, can I safely follow online instructions or should I get a pal to help? Want to make tomato jam and salsa. ps Hi, Sean!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:08 Carrie Oliver
10:08
Kim ODonnel: 
PAL. Always do it with someone else the first 10 times or so...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:08 Kim ODonnel
10:08
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Related to the caramel sauce question: you know what would make a good book? One that talks about canning all the stuff people ask us about but that there is no info on. Like caramel sauce. The density of the caramel sauce makes it seem like it would not be safe to can. But there should be a place to go for that info.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:08 Jeanne in Seattle
10:08
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sean: is it possible to pressure-can oil based pickles?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:08 Jeanne in Seattle
10:08
Marisa McClellan: 
I'm so glad I'm finished with tomatoes for the season. 100 pounds is a ridiculous amount.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:08 Marisa McClellan
10:09
Sean Timberlake: 
Carrie -- if nothing else, it's just more fun to do it with a pal.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Sean Timberlake
10:09
Kim ODonnel: 
100 pounds, marisa? Holy moly.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Kim ODonnel
10:09
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
If the oil is minimal and i include vinegar, i am assuming that's safe, yes?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Raghavan Iyer
10:09
Marisa McClellan: 
Carrie, I totally agree with Kim. It's always better to can with a friend.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Marisa McClellan
10:09
[Comment From Claire in NJ Claire in NJ : ] 
I have 50 pounds of sweet taters! Do you have any ideas or recipes for candied sweet potatoes for canning?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Claire in NJ
10:09
Marisa McClellan: 
Kim, it's the second year I've done 100 pounds and I think it might be the last. Too much work.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Marisa McClellan
10:09
Sean Timberlake: 
Jeanne: I don't think there's any pressure can recipes for oil pickles either. I've only preserved under oil in the fridge -- Italian sott'olio method. But not canning per se.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Sean Timberlake
10:09
Kim ODonnel: 
Claire in NJ: It's my understanding that sweet potatoes would need to be pressure canned...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:09 Kim ODonnel
10:10
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Raghavan: The main issue is acidity. The spices do not matter in terms of adding safety. It's the acid. There is no acid in that recipe. Also, the high amount of oil complicates things.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 Jeanne in Seattle
10:10
Sean Timberlake: 
We're about to do our annual 200# tomato extravaganza with friends -- 100# at each house over two weeks.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 Sean Timberlake
10:10
[Comment From Carrie Oliver Carrie Oliver : ] 
Excellent, thanks for the feedback.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 Carrie Oliver
10:10
Kim ODonnel: 
Oh my goodness. Talk about tomato-palooza....
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 Kim ODonnel
10:10
[Comment From KarenMc KarenMc : ] 
Im fairly new to canning (3 years) Im treating myself to a pressure canner and would like to know what brand, make model you suggest. I like to can stews and soups (quarts) and make huge stock pots to share in my community so a big canner would be good (I think)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 KarenMc
10:10
Marisa McClellan: 
Claire, here's the link to the NCHFP page on canning potatoes: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_04/potato_sweet.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 Marisa McClellan
10:10
Sean Timberlake: 
Yeah, but it's so rewarding to crack open those cans in the winter!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:10 Sean Timberlake
10:11
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
Marisa - I'll probably end up with 100lbs this year, but I generally break it up into 15 - 20lb segments. Makes it much less daunting, IMO.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Kaela
10:11
Sean Timberlake: 
KarenMc, I use the Presto 23-quart and love it. All our friends here have the same.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Sean Timberlake
10:11
[Comment From Kai Kai : ] 
Thanks Marisa. Me too. So frustrating. Anyone else? When I go the store and see Michael Recchiuti, Happy goat etc, I wonder how they are doing it.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Kai
10:11
Marisa McClellan: 
Kaela, I think that's wise. I need to not get them all at once next year.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Marisa McClellan
10:11
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sean: got it. That's what I thought. We get tons of questions about those.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Jeanne in Seattle
10:11
Sarah B. Hood: 
Sweet potatoes are too low acid to be canned safely; and no point in any case because they keep so long. With any oil-based recipe like the Indian spices, the oil is the preservative, but if you can it you cause an anaerobic environment that's ripe for botulism toxins.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Sarah B. Hood
10:11
[Comment From Claire in NJ Claire in NJ : ] 
@ kim yes I understand pressure canning is needed for sweet potatoes
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:11 Claire in NJ
10:12
Kim ODonnel: 
Okay, cool. Now who's got thoughts on making candied sweet potatoes for pressure canner?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Kim ODonnel
10:12
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
I am new to canning, just started this summer, and made some great Green Chile & Green Tomato Relish - one of my jars had more head space than the others, is it okay?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Leigh
10:12
Sean Timberlake: 
Sarah, do pressure canned sweet potatoes maintain their texture?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Sean Timberlake
10:12
[Comment From Myra Kohn Myra Kohn : ] 
Good morning KimO, everyone! What a great panel you have today. Glad to be able to join and "listen in". :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Myra Kohn
10:12
Sean Timberlake: 
er, integrity
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Sean Timberlake
10:12
Marisa McClellan: 
As far as pressure canners go, I have the 16 quart Presto. My stove is fairly tiny, so I went with the smallest canner they make and I love it. Holds seven quarts with ease.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Marisa McClellan
10:12
Sarah B. Hood: 
Hi, folks by the way. Sorry for my late arrival.

I'm not a pressure canner. I would guess they'd end up like baked sweet potatoes.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Sarah B. Hood
10:12
Kim ODonnel: 
Hey Myra! Glad to have you aboard!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Kim ODonnel
10:12
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I just canned 8 quarts of tomato sauce (from the Ball Blue Book), and am canning more with Kim tomorrow! Tomato-paloozza, yes!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:12 Jeanne in Seattle
10:13
[Comment From Claire in NJ Claire in NJ : ] 
thx Marisa
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Claire in NJ
10:13
[Comment From Samantha Gorelick Samantha Gorelick : ] 
Hi everyone! Does anyone know if commercial canning can be done in a commercial kitchen that does not have any additional licensing?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Samantha Gorelick
10:13
Marisa McClellan: 
Leigh, don't worry about the headspace, your relish should be just fine.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Marisa McClellan
10:13
Sean Timberlake: 
Yeah, I was just concerned that they might inadvertently turn into more of a mash in the jar
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Sean Timberlake
10:13
Marisa McClellan: 
Samantha, that is something that varies from state to state. You'd have to do some research to find out what your municipality allows.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Marisa McClellan
10:13
Kim ODonnel: 
Was thinking the same thing, Sean. I keep thinking it would be equivalent of pumpkin pie filling...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Kim ODonnel
10:13
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Karen Mc: yep, the 23 quart is the one I have.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Jeanne in Seattle
10:13
Sean Timberlake: 
Leigh, additional headspace shouldn't be a problem, other than potential for oxidation.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:13 Sean Timberlake
10:14
Sarah B. Hood: 
Commercial canning regulations vary by country and state. Here in Ontario the regs are quick strict, but in NY state they're much more relaxed.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:14 Sarah B. Hood
10:14
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
do you normally have a ratio wrt a cup of vegetables how much acid?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:14 Raghavan Iyer
10:14
[Comment From KarenMc KarenMc : ] 
thank you marissa, I was looking for a larger one :o)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:14 KarenMc
10:14
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
We're very relaxed in NY state. ;)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:14 Kaela
10:14
Sarah B. Hood: 
Raghavan, you can use tested recipes to get the ratios.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:14 Sarah B. Hood
10:14
Sean Timberlake: 
Raghavan, all vegetables have different acid levels. The USDA site will have specific recipes.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:14 Sean Timberlake
10:15
Sarah B. Hood: 
Kaela, a NY state of mind?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Sarah B. Hood
10:15
Marisa McClellan: 
Most of Pennsylvania is relaxed (thanks to the amish), but not Philadelphia.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Marisa McClellan
10:15
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Did the sweet potato question already get answered? It is not recommended to can mashed sweet potatoes. Too dense. There are worries that the heat won't penetrate the center of the jars.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Jeanne in Seattle
10:15
Kim ODonnel: 
Jeanne, great to know. That's what I had suspected.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Kim ODonnel
10:15
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
@ Sean - will make an effort to eat pronto! Any thoughts on canning Beef Vegetable soup? I have made a ridiculously large batch today! Will it be okay if I add noodles?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Leigh
10:15
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
thanks for the tips - great topic
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Raghavan Iyer
10:15
Sean Timberlake: 
Right, mashed sweet potatoes, like pumpkin puree/butter, not recommended in any method.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Sean Timberlake
10:15
Sarah B. Hood: 
And again, sweet potatoes can be kept for months anyway. Put the canning effort into something more perishable. :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:15 Sarah B. Hood
10:16
Kim ODonnel: 
Raghavan, this group is tops. There's nothing they can't answer on this topic...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 Kim ODonnel
10:16
[Comment From Samantha Gorelick Samantha Gorelick : ] 
Thanks, Marisa, Sarah, and Kaela. It's been hard for me to get info in NY, but I'm going to contact Cornell Cooperative Extension because I really don't want any trouble :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 Samantha Gorelick
10:16
Sarah B. Hood: 
*blush*
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 Sarah B. Hood
10:16
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kim: yeah, any of those dense veggies: squash and potatoes are not recommended to be canned mashed. Too dense. So, no pumpkin pie filling for canning.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 Jeanne in Seattle
10:16
Sean Timberlake: 
Leigh, anything with meat in it will need to be pressure canned. Again, check the USDA site for recommendations. I wouldn't add noodles up front as they'll get soggy and maybe disintegrate. Add them when you reheat.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 Sean Timberlake
10:16
Marisa McClellan: 
Leigh, from what I understand, it's not advisable to add noodles to soups you plan on pressure canning.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 Marisa McClellan
10:16
[Comment From star star : ] 
How can you tell if canned meat has gone bad? We canned tuna this summer and now some one mentioned botulism.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:16 star
10:17
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
So how do you guys suggest I process all my little pie pumpkins? In chunks?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Leigh
10:17
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Star: did you pressure can it?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Jeanne in Seattle
10:17
Marisa McClellan: 
Star, that's the trouble with botulism, there's no way to tell if it's there or not.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Marisa McClellan
10:17
Sean Timberlake: 
Star, you can't. If you are concerned, then you'd best dispose of it without opening the container. But was it canned properly?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Sean Timberlake
10:17
Sean Timberlake: 
Leigh, yes, there's a tested recipe for pressure canning pumpkin chunks.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Sean Timberlake
10:17
Sarah B. Hood: 
I have been assured by Toronto Public Health that if your jar develops botulism toxin, the seal WILL fail. Which is good because you won't see, smell or taste a difference.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Sarah B. Hood
10:17
Sean Timberlake: 
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/tips/fall/pumpkins.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:17 Sean Timberlake
10:18
Sean Timberlake: 
Sarah, that's good to know ... I hadn't heard that.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Sean Timberlake
10:18
Kim ODonnel: 
Sarah, this is interesting. First time I'm seeing this.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Kim ODonnel
10:18
Marisa McClellan: 
I did an illustrated post on how to pressure can pumpkin last fall: http://www.foodinjars.com/2010/11/how-to-can-cubed-pumpkin/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Marisa McClellan
10:18
[Comment From Guest Guest : ] 
I believe if you take your rings off your jars once they seal you'll know fairly soon if you have botulism going on the seal will slide off
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Guest
10:18
Marisa McClellan: 
Sarah, I've never heard that about seals failing on jars with botulism.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Marisa McClellan
10:18
Sarah B. Hood: 
I know, I was surprised that the woman who was teaching the safe food handling course had such a positive answer.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Sarah B. Hood
10:18
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
as a beginner any one source for good recipes
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Louise E Edsall
10:18
Sarah B. Hood: 
The rule should still be: if in doubt, throw it out.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:18 Sarah B. Hood
10:19
Kim ODonnel: 
Oh you've come to the right place, Louise! Panelists, please share your links, please...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:19 Kim ODonnel
10:19
Sean Timberlake: 
If you have a failed seal on something low-acid, though, the USDA's recommendation for handling it is rather extreme -- wear gloves and a mask, get it into a sealed container as quickly as possible. Botulism can be contracted through contact.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:19 Sean Timberlake
10:19
Marisa McClellan: 
I know that seals fail when other microorganisms develop in the jar because they off-gas as they multiply. But I didn't think that botulism did that. Interesting.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:19 Marisa McClellan
10:20
Sean Timberlake: 
Louise, the USDA site has plenty of recipes, and the Ball Blue Book is more or less the gold standard.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Sean Timberlake
10:20
Kim ODonnel: 
And if I may, Canning Across America (www.canningacrossamerica.com) has reliable, safe recipes...and The Ball site (freshpreserving.com)...what are you thinking of preserving for your maiden voyage?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Kim ODonnel
10:20
Marisa McClellan: 
Louise, the National Center for Home Food Preservation is a good resource, though their recipes can be a bit dry and unwielding at times.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Marisa McClellan
10:20
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
And very important: DO NOT COMPOST canned good that have gone bad.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Jeanne in Seattle
10:20
Sarah B. Hood: 
I would still not trust that a sealed jar is safe, but that any unsealed jar is unsafe. For the record.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Sarah B. Hood
10:20
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sarah: you mentioned that yesterday on our Twitter chat. Did she explain why botulism makes it fail? As far as I have been told, botulism is silent and deadly. No really clues. I wonder if she meant mold or something.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Jeanne in Seattle
10:20
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
Sarah: Interesting, I hadn't heard that either. But surely, there is some level of toxin production that falls below popping-lids-off but above 'safe?"
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Kaela
10:20
[Comment From star star : ] 
Yes. It was canned properly. The woman who taught me has been canning for years, and all. The jars sealed.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 star
10:20
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
@Marisa~ I love illustrated instructions, so helpful...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Leigh
10:20
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
its always seemed intimidating to me
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:20 Louise E Edsall
10:21
Marisa McClellan: 
Here's their main link: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:21 Marisa McClellan
10:21
Sean Timberlake: 
Every time I speak to people who want to can, even skilled cooks and learned people, they are always intimidated. Until they do it, and see how easy it can be. Fortify! That's what we're here for -- to inspire you into action.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:21 Sean Timberlake
10:21
Marisa McClellan: 
Tigress has a really good introductory post: http://tigressinajam.blogspot.com/2009/05/canning-101.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:21 Marisa McClellan
10:21
Kim ODonnel: 
Louise, like I just said to Carrie, I always recommend that beginner can with a friend to get the hang of it. Decide what you want to put up, then find a tested recipe on any of the sites we're sharing here today. It's one of the most gratifying things you can do for yourself.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:21 Kim ODonnel
10:22
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
for pumpkin our family always roasted or boiled then froze the mashed or in chunks. measured for easy defrosting for pie making :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:22
Kim ODonnel: 
Ah yes, freezing. It always gets overlooked when we talk about preserving...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Kim ODonnel
10:22
Marisa McClellan: 
Deb, freezing is a really good option for pumpkin, assuming you have the freezer space.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Marisa McClellan
10:22
Sean Timberlake: 
Deb, freezing pumpkin is an excellent preservation method. It's worth noting that canning isn't the answer to everything.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Sean Timberlake
10:22
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
Ya know, since my Grandmother has passed and my Mom is as new to canning as I am, I cannot express my thanks enough for these internet resources!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Leigh
10:22
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Star: what makes you worried about your tuna?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Jeanne in Seattle
10:22
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I don't know about you guys, but when I'm wearing my Canning Across America "hat" I want to tattoo the web address of the National Center on Home Food Preservation web site on my forehead. That is the first place folks should go with questions.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:22 Jeanne in Seattle
10:23
Sean Timberlake: 
Jeanne, amen.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:23 Sean Timberlake
10:23
Marisa McClellan: 
Audra from Doris and Jilly Cook just did a fun radio interview about preserving vegetables by freezing with our local NPR station: http://dorisandjillycook.com/2011/09/09/vegetables-on-ice/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:23 Marisa McClellan
10:23
Sarah B. Hood: 
True.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:23 Sarah B. Hood
10:23
Sarah B. Hood: 
I specifically asked about botulism. She said the lid would fail. This could only mean that the process of toxin formation involves gas formation/expansion. But again, I would only trust this insofar as to say: if a jar seal fails, get ride of the contents.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:23 Sarah B. Hood
10:23
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Also, please note that old books/recipes say it's OK to can mashed potatoes and squash. That's why it's important to use up to date recipes.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:23 Jeanne in Seattle
10:23
[Comment From Tanya (indigomuse) Tanya (indigomuse) : ] 
Can you freeze pumpkin butter?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:23 Tanya (indigomuse)
10:24
Sean Timberlake: 
I think it's also worth noting that even the most experienced among us check with each other and refer to resources All. The. Time. It's always a good idea to check yourself.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:24 Sean Timberlake
10:24
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Tanya: no. No mashed or buttered squashes or potatoes can be canned.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:24 Jeanne in Seattle
10:24
Sean Timberlake: 
Tanya, yes, you can freeze it, but not can it.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:24 Sean Timberlake
10:24
Marisa McClellan: 
Tanya, you certainly can freeze pumpkin butter. Remember to allow extra headspace for expansion.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:24 Marisa McClellan
10:24
Kim ODonnel: 
Sean makes an excellent point. There's no way to know everything about preserving and there is a ton of information exchange.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:24 Kim ODonnel
10:25
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
thanks. I have peaaches and pears too
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 Louise E Edsall
10:25
Kim ODonnel: 
Louise, sounds like peach jam is in your future!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 Kim ODonnel
10:25
[Comment From Leigh Leigh : ] 
on pumpkin canning- I was thinking of processing in cubes with the pie spices, then when needed just whiz in the processor and add the sugar and other ingredients for pie?? Good idea or not?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 Leigh
10:25
Sarah B. Hood: 
I discovered southern-style pickled peaches last year and now I'm a convert.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 Sarah B. Hood
10:25
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
About dehydration: for peaches, how do I not dry to the point of crunchiness? How much moisture is acceptable, and won't promote mold?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 cdthomas
10:25
Sean Timberlake: 
Leigh, I'd can the chunks just as is -- you can always add spicing later.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 Sean Timberlake
10:25
Marisa McClellan: 
Leigh, yes to what Sean just said.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:25 Marisa McClellan
10:26
Kim ODonnel: 
Pickled peaches. Now that sounds fab. Haven't done that (yet).
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:26 Kim ODonnel
10:26
[Comment From Brooke - in Oregon Brooke - in Oregon : ] 
I just want to thank all of you for sharing your wonderful recipes and know-how with us! You ROCK
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:26 Brooke - in Oregon
10:26
Sean Timberlake: 
Ooh, wish we had Joel from Well Preserved here. He's the dehydrating master.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:26 Sean Timberlake
10:26
[Comment From Kai Kai : ] 
For canning chili I've only seen reference to using the recipes in the books. I have my own tried and true recipe and want it in jars. Have a pressure canner. Should I just check the ph level and use that as a guide for times?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:26 Kai
10:26
Sarah B. Hood: 
You stick a clove into each peach half. They're the classic southern addition to the Thanksgiving table. And they're yummy.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:26 Sarah B. Hood
10:27
[Comment From star star : ] 
Growing up my father never let my mom can meats because of the spear and then when I can add to that I mention that there is a possibility of that happening, and that's why she doesnt can meat. so now I worry .
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 star
10:27
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Also, there is a Search function at the very bottom of the National Center For Home Food Preservation site. So useful for specific questions.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Jeanne in Seattle
10:27
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
Especially when drying halves -- slices actually shrink too small, too fast....
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 cdthomas
10:27
[Comment From Tanya (indigomuse) Tanya (indigomuse) : ] 
Thanks! I never thought about freezing it until this year. I may try this so I can have yummy pumpkin through the winter.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Tanya (indigomuse)
10:27
Sarah B. Hood: 
Yes, Sean, Joel's the master.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Sarah B. Hood
10:27
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
@cdthomas: I dry peaches & nectarines all the time (they are fabulous); I dry them to the point where they are leathery, flexible, but not moist. They've last more than a year without mold.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Kaela
10:27
Sean Timberlake: 
Kai, pressure canning obviates the need for acidity. However, if it's not a tested recipe there may not be a way of knowing how long to pressure can it.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Sean Timberlake
10:27
Marisa McClellan: 
I did a recipe for pickled nectarines for Serious Eats this week. You could easily swap the peaches for the nectarines.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Marisa McClellan
10:27
Kim ODonnel: 
Kaela, do you do it in a low oven or in a dehydrator?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:27 Kim ODonnel
10:28
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
My mother dehydrates lots of fruits. she always bagged them up and put them in the freezer for storage instead of in a coldroom. never worried about too much moisture... lol
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:28 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:28
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kai: do you have a pH meter? I was always taught that pH strips are inaccurate for canning. What do the other folks think about pH strips?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:28 Jeanne in Seattle
10:28
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
any preferred dehydrators?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:28 Louise E Edsall
10:28
Sarah B. Hood: 
I have been told pH strips are not accurate enough.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:28 Sarah B. Hood
10:28
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Kaela -- do you cut to halves, or smaller?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:28 cdthomas
10:29
Marisa McClellan: 
Jeanne, I've not gone the pH strip route, though Putting Up and Putting Up More (two books by Stephen Palmer Downey) have me intrigued.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:29 Marisa McClellan
10:29
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
I use a dehydrator set to 135 degrees; takes about 12ish hours. But I pick through them and pull out ones as they are done, because I'm not very good at keeping all my slices the same size. You could do it in a a low oven for 6-8 hours I suspect. I know Shae has dried in her oven's warming drawer.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:29 Kaela
10:29
[Comment From Kai Kai : ] 
@Jeanne, I don't. Wondered that too as the strips would get all colored with the dark tomato based chili...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:29 Kai
10:29
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Deb -- I freeze, of course, for a few days to kill off pesties, but it would be nice to make some shelf-stable.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:29 cdthomas
10:30
Marisa McClellan: 
Oops, that Serious Eats link is here: http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/09/how-to-make-pickled-nectarine-slices.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:30 Marisa McClellan
10:30
Sean Timberlake: 
pH strips only test what it comes into contact with. You'd need to puree your food thoroughly to get a good read. I tried Stephen Palmer Downey's method using litmus paper with a narrow range, only pH <_7 _='_' span='span'>
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:30 Sean Timberlake
10:30
Kim ODonnel: 
Sean, Marisa, Sarah: here's what I want to know: What do you like to preserve after the fall harvest fades away? Say in December or January?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:30 Kim ODonnel
10:30
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Kaela -- I have a dehydrator with no temp control -- how do I measure, to check?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:30 cdthomas
10:30
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
@cdthomas. i hear ya. i like having things accessible in my pantry too.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:30 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:30
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
@cdthomas Halves would take way too long to dry, IMO. I cut slices, about 1/4-inch thick; so in a typical peach, I get about 6 to 8 slices per half. I'm using them primarily for homemade granola, so it's a perfect size for me. I suspect you could go to ~4 slices per half, but no thicker, or the outsides would get crunchy before the insides dry out.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:30 Kaela
10:31
Sean Timberlake: 
Kim: Pantry space. Kidding.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:31 Sean Timberlake
10:31
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Also, home COOKING recipes are usually not great for CANNING. That's why you need a recipe specifically for canning. We had a gal in our group who once brought beef stew to a canning exchange. When asked, she said she water bath processed it for a longer time than normal and therefore it was safe. Gah. NOT SAFE! Processing something longer doesn't necessarily make it safe.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:31 Jeanne in Seattle
10:31
Marisa McClellan: 
To be perfectly honest, I like to take a little bit of a break from the canning pot. Though I will make things like pear jam, cranberry chutney and preserved lemons.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:31 Marisa McClellan
10:31
[Comment From Shibaguyz Shibaguyz : ] 
Heya! Geek here… the Botulinum toxin is a protein type thingamabob that is given off by a bacterium type thingy… so… yes, it does off-gas. It can bulge metal cans. Whether it will "pop" a seal… don't know. *end geek transmission*
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:31 Shibaguyz
10:31
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sean: ah, good point. We've been getting pH strip questions a lot on our Twitter feed.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:31 Jeanne in Seattle
10:32
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Hi Shibaguyz!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:32 Jeanne in Seattle
10:32
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Kaela -- got it. We're at the height of Palisades peach season, so i want one more shot at them....
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:32 cdthomas
10:32
Sean Timberlake: 
Jeanne -- yes, even with a narrow range litmus paper and a good puree, I would err WAY on the side of safe, e.g., 4.2 or better, even though 4.6 is considered safe.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:32 Sean Timberlake
10:32
[Comment From Shibaguyz Shibaguyz : ] 
heya Hot Pants!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:32 Shibaguyz
10:32
[Comment From Tanya (indigomuse) Tanya (indigomuse) : ] 
@Marissa Do you have a link to a favorite recipe for preserved lemons? That sounds like fun!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:32 Tanya (indigomuse)
10:32
Sarah B. Hood: 
Shibaguyz, my dad was obsessed with bulging tin cans for that reason; in the mid 20th century commercial cans were no so dependable as they are now.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:32 Sarah B. Hood
10:33
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
@cdthomas I think most dehydrators were designed with fruit & vegetables in mind, so if there is only one temp ("on") it's probably in the range of 135 - 145 degrees. I would just test it out with a tray or two of peach slices, and check after a few hours. You'll get a sense of how long it is going to take.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:33 Kaela
10:33
Marisa McClellan: 
Tanya, I posted my method for preserved lemons last winter. Here it is: http://www.foodinjars.com/2011/02/preserving-lemons/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:33 Marisa McClellan
10:33
Sean Timberlake: 
As for the off-season question, that's a good time to do pressure canned meats. We did some pulled pork last year that was fabulous. The pressure canning really breaks down the collagen in the meat and makes it silky.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:33 Sean Timberlake
10:33
Sarah B. Hood: 
David Lebowitz (Sweet Life in Paris) is one of many people with a preserved lemon receipe, but basically it's: cut into quarters, but not all the way. Bury in salt.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:33 Sarah B. Hood
10:34
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sean: Agreed. I just tell people to use a pH meter. My philosophy is: if you're getting into creativity territory, you need to know enough of what you're doing to be able to use a pH meter.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:34 Jeanne in Seattle
10:34
Sean Timberlake: 
Yes, lemons + salt. Also feel free to add spices, like cinnamon, cloves.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:34 Sean Timberlake
10:34
Kim ODonnel: 
I still want to put up Pacific albacore tuna. anyone of you ever do this?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:34 Kim ODonnel
10:34
Sarah B. Hood: 
Although northerns have to fresh local produce through the winter, that's when citrus and tropicals come into season, so one can do marmalades as well.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:34 Sarah B. Hood
10:34
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Thanks! I am perusing as I watch the table talk! I am so excited. I have been through the process once with my mom and grandmother
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:34 Louise E Edsall
10:34
[Comment From star star : ] 
Thanks for the help. I'm actually participating over my smart phone. So thanks for forgiving spelling issues.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:34 star
10:35
Sean Timberlake: 
Re: Tuna, I have not personally but know plenty of people who have. You need to do small quantities -- I think max 1/2 pint?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:35 Sean Timberlake
10:35
Marisa McClellan: 
I've not canned tuna, Kim. But I want to someday. I've read this post at least three times: http://culinariaeugenius.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/albacore-tuna-canning/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:35 Marisa McClellan
10:35
Kim ODonnel: 
I love it! 21st century technology to spread the ancient art & science of food preservation.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:35 Kim ODonnel
10:35
[Comment From Shibaguyz Shibaguyz : ] 
Sarah - I remember checking the cans in our cellar to make sure there weren't any bulges. Times have definitely changed! (great… now I'm an OLD geek…)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:35 Shibaguyz
10:36
Sarah B. Hood: 
Shibaguyz, I'm an old geek too. :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:36 Sarah B. Hood
10:36
[Comment From star star : ] 
Kim, we did albacore abt a month ago. it was pretty easy, but time intensive.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:36 star
10:36
Kim ODonnel: 
Star, I can imagine it's really gratifying, too.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:36 Kim ODonnel
10:36
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Almost missed y'all! Popped my canning cherry this year!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:36 Jackie
10:36
Kim ODonnel: 
Woo hoo! Congrats Jackie.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:36 Kim ODonnel
10:37
[Comment From Erin Erin : ] 
Hello from sodden central PA! I have trouble keeping my jars hot from the time that I wash them, to the time that I hot-pack them with whatever I'm putting up (usually pickles). A friend of mine will simply put them into a 300d oven until she's ready to fill and process them. What is the best way to sterilize the jars and keep them hot for this process? I'd prefer not to boil my jars in the canning pot as I'm heating up the water: our water is so very hard, it covers everything with a fine layer of calcium. And, I've got beets. A lot of beets. Anyone have a decent recipe for doing something with them other than the Blue Book recipe? Thank you! I have learned so much from reading everyone's blogs and twitters and facebook postings!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:37 Erin
10:37
Sean Timberlake: 
Everyone I know who's canned tuna says it will change your life; you'll never go back to store bought.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:37 Sean Timberlake
10:37
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Kaela -- so how/when do you prep your fruit? To accommodate 12 hours, that means doing it at sunrise, then staying home to check? Just trying to fit drying in with weekend farmer's market trips.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:37 cdthomas
10:37
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
that's what we do in india with lemons - salt the heck out of them and keep them in the sun and once they become tender we fold in cayenne and turmeric.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:37 Raghavan Iyer
10:37
Sarah B. Hood: 
Erin, I simply leave my jars in the canner but turn off the heat or turn it way down.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:37 Sarah B. Hood
10:37
Marisa McClellan: 
Erin, have you tried adding white vinegar to your canning pot to prevent your hard water from leaving mineral deposits on your jars?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:37 Marisa McClellan
10:38
Sean Timberlake: 
Erin, as long as you are processing jars for at least 10 minutes in the water bath canner, or by pressure canner, you don't need to worry about sterilization, so in those cases you could keep them in the oven for hot packing.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Sean Timberlake
10:38
[Comment From Stef Stef : ] 
With canning tomato sauce via bwb, does the lemon always have to be the bottled kind?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Stef
10:38
Marisa McClellan: 
And as far as beets go, I love this recipe for gingery beets from Kevin West: http://www.savingtheseason.com/journal/golden-beets-pickled-with-ginger.html
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Marisa McClellan
10:38
Sean Timberlake: 
But I, too, keep mine in the canner until I'm ready to pack.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Sean Timberlake
10:38
Sarah B. Hood: 
Better to use bottled lemon because acidity will be standard.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Sarah B. Hood
10:38
Kim ODonnel: 
Stef, the bottled lemon juice has consistent acidity, unlike fresh lemons.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Kim ODonnel
10:38
Kim ODonnel: 
Jinx, Sarah!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:38 Kim ODonnel
10:39
[Comment From Shibaguyz Shibaguyz : ] 
I'm gonna come sit by you, Sarah…
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Shibaguyz
10:39
Sarah B. Hood: 
Urgh
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Sarah B. Hood
10:39
[Comment From star star : ] 
The woman that taught us to can tuna does hers in pints. I did mine in half pints.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 star
10:39
[Comment From Tanya (indigomuse) Tanya (indigomuse) : ] 
@marisa Thanks for the link! I'm intrigued and am now reading about the ways I can use them in.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Tanya (indigomuse)
10:39
Sarah B. Hood: 
Shibaguyz :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Sarah B. Hood
10:39
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
This is a salmon recipe, from Ms. Bone: http://blogs.denverpost.com/preserved/2011/08/17/canned-salmon/1841/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 cdthomas
10:39
Sean Timberlake: 
Sarah and Kim -- did you see Linda Ziedrich's piece on real lemons versus ReaLemon? http://agardenerstable.com/2011/04/19/real-lemon-versus-realemon/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Sean Timberlake
10:39
Kim ODonnel: 
Thanks cdthomas. Eugenia came online with me a few years ago.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Kim ODonnel
10:39
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
You can preserve lemons?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:39 Louise E Edsall
10:40
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Hey Raghavan! What did you decide to do with all those green tomatoes? Maybe some chutney?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Jackie
10:40
Sarah B. Hood: 
The gingery beets sound great, Marisa. I have about one jar of beets from my garden; may try...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Sarah B. Hood
10:40
[Comment From Stef Stef : ] 
Thanks! I', loving this chat. Newbie canner here.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Stef
10:40
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Any recipes for canning involve honey? I am a beekeeper with loads of it.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Louise E Edsall
10:40
Sarah B. Hood: 
Sean: No! Will check it out!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Sarah B. Hood
10:40
Sarah B. Hood: 
Hey, Stef!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Sarah B. Hood
10:40
Kim ODonnel: 
Louise, yes you can make jam with honey!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Kim ODonnel
10:40
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
wow, thxs for all the great links!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:40
Sean Timberlake: 
Louise, yes, you can use honey in preserves. You'll get a different texture, but it's fine.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Sean Timberlake
10:40
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
I had an epiphany. I was thinking about a "little of this, a little of that." then realized I have to separate "canning" from "cooking" in my head. Canning = food preservation. Cooking is what I do later, with what I have put by.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:40 Jackie
10:41
[Comment From star star : ] 
Tablespoon of cream of tartar in a pressure canner's water while canning will keep the canner looking new... not sure if it helps with water spots.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 star
10:41
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
@Jackie, I am, as we speak, boiling a batch of green tomato chutney with a new line of roasted spice blends i am rolling out in october...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 Raghavan Iyer
10:41
Sarah B. Hood: 
Generally honey changes colour & consistency a bit, and you use some sugar with the honey, but hey, it's what the Romans used. It has antibacterial properties of its own. Check out university extension sites for ratios and further details.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 Sarah B. Hood
10:41
Kim ODonnel: 
Love it. Preserving by laptop...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 Kim ODonnel
10:41
Sean Timberlake: 
I rounded up some honey recipes on PD: http://www.punkdomestics.com/content/honey-month -- everything from jam to dehydrated honey to pickles
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 Sean Timberlake
10:41
Marisa McClellan: 
Louise, one thing to note about canning with honey is that the preserves don't last as long once open as those made with sugar do.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 Marisa McClellan
10:41
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
I have a concord grape jam recipe that uses honey. The best smelling stuff on the planet--wow.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:41 Jeanne in Seattle
10:42
[Comment From Erin Erin : ] 
Thank you Marisa, and everyone for the oven/canner tips and the gingery beet recipe. I've pulled all of our beets to make room for planting garlic, and have to do something with the bloody orbs. (I do not like beets very much.)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:42 Erin
10:42
Sean Timberlake: 
Marisa, why is that?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:42 Sean Timberlake
10:42
Sean Timberlake: 
Erin, I'll take those beets off your hands
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:42 Sean Timberlake
10:42
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Jackie: that is a very good point.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:42 Jeanne in Seattle
10:42
[Comment From Shibaguyz Shibaguyz : ] 
any thoughts on using sugar substitutes in canning process? effects? preferences? ick??
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:42 Shibaguyz
10:42
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Raghavan: A green tomato relish recipe safe for canning: http://www.denverpost.com/ci_10593610
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:42 cdthomas
10:43
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
These links are great! I haven't done much but that tuna sounds wonderful
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Louise E Edsall
10:43
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Thank you Sarah on the honey info.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Louise E Edsall
10:43
Marisa McClellan: 
When you dilute and boil honey, it loses much of it's preserving oomph. I don't know why it happens, but it does.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Marisa McClellan
10:43
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Erin - beautiful, simple recipe in Sherri Brooks Vinton's book for beets with clove.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Jackie
10:43
Sarah B. Hood: 
Mmm, beets! Try 'em with fennel, like Audra from Dors and Jilly Cook. http://dorisandjillycook.com/2010/06/29/pickled-beets-with-fennel/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Sarah B. Hood
10:43
Kim ODonnel: 
Marisa, that is fascinating.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Kim ODonnel
10:43
Sean Timberlake: 
Shibaguys, that's a little tricky. Sugar is more than a sweetener -- it's a preservative. When you reduce or eliminate sugar it really changes the chemistry. But it's possible. It will reduce the shelf life, too. Trick is finding tested recipes.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Sean Timberlake
10:43
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
@cdthomas I usually put mine in the dehydrator in the evening and then check on them in the morning. Worth noting that it can take much longer if it is humid/raining (as it has been here) so it can take up to 18 hours at times. It's really not an exact science; and if I have some that get a little over-dried for my liking, I chop them up and add them to chutney. :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:43 Kaela
10:44
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
i thought honey was very shelf stable... sugar substitutes are ICK!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:44
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
thanks cd - am also planning on making the oil-based tomato pickles and freezing them
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Raghavan Iyer
10:44
[Comment From Tanya (indigomuse) Tanya (indigomuse) : ] 
@Louise We need to do a swap. You send me honey, I send you preserves made from your honey ;)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Tanya (indigomuse)
10:44
Marisa McClellan: 
Undiluted honey is VERY shelf stable.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Marisa McClellan
10:44
Kim ODonnel: 
One can also do a mix of honey & sugar in jam, correct?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Kim ODonnel
10:44
Sean Timberlake: 
Deb, honey on its own is more than shelf stable -- it's been found in tombs from ancient Egypt, perfectly edible.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Sean Timberlake
10:44
Sarah B. Hood: 
If you want to explore low sugar, check out Pomona's pectin. It will only last a few weeks after opening, though.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:44 Sarah B. Hood
10:45
Kim ODonnel: 
Sarah, I'm so glad you pointed this out about pectin. Important little tidbit.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Kim ODonnel
10:45
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
newbie q: how does one preserve honey? is it so antibac that no processing's necessary?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 cdthomas
10:45
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Hey Jeanne, thanks. I think it's common for newbies like me. Helped me a lot to reorient my thinking.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Jackie
10:45
Sean Timberlake: 
Marisa, the dilution makes sense. It is after all how you make mead so diluted honey --> fermentation
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Sean Timberlake
10:45
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Thanks Sean for that. The Asian honey market is very scary. Buy local everyone.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Louise E Edsall
10:45
Sarah B. Hood: 
Yes, Kim, most jam receipes using homey also have sugar.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Sarah B. Hood
10:45
[Comment From Shibaguyz Shibaguyz : ] 
it is a different chemical compound that breaks differently under the application of heat… geek again…
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Shibaguyz
10:45
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Jeanne can I have that concord grape jam recipe?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Louise E Edsall
10:45
Sarah B. Hood: 
Honey is shelf stable for years and needs no preservatives.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:45 Sarah B. Hood
10:46
Sean Timberlake: 
Yes! Buy your honey locally or at least from a reputable source. Asian honey is scary stuff.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:46 Sean Timberlake
10:46
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
The thing that I do with my dehydrator is have a constantly rotating series of things in it. It is on the counter, always on. Has several heat settings. We just peel stuff off of a tray when we want it. Then I pack in mason jars.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:46 Jeanne in Seattle
10:46
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
How about beans, do people can those to avoid the BPA in commercial canned beans?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:46 Jackie
10:46
Kim ODonnel: 
Jackie, it should be pointed out that there is BPA in lids in those boxes of jars you're buying, too...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:46 Kim ODonnel
10:46
Sean Timberlake: 
Jackie, I haven't done that yet, but I intend to. There's a recipe for baked beans that starts out with dry beans in the jar, pressure canned. Want to try it.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:46 Sean Timberlake
10:46
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Kaela I'm in Colorado, so times can actually be too long, humidity-wise.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:46 cdthomas
10:47
[Comment From Erin Erin : ] 
Thank you, Jackie! And Sarah!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Erin
10:47
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
I preserve with honey and/or maple syrup, pretty often: in my experience, room temp shelf life is the same; it's once you open the jar that honey-only jams will mold faster than sugared-jams.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Kaela
10:47
Sarah B. Hood: 
There is BPA in canning lids too but if jars are upright and you leave headspace, there is very little transfer.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Sarah B. Hood
10:47
Marisa McClellan: 
Jackie, do mean beans like pinto or black beans? Those can safely be pressure canned. Like Sean, it's something I've not done yet, but am meaning to do.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Marisa McClellan
10:47
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
@(Tanya) of course!! You know me here in VA!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Louise E Edsall
10:47
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Yes, I know but I figure it's a good measure less than the whole can liner?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Jackie
10:47
Kim ODonnel: 
Yep, you got it, Jackie.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Kim ODonnel
10:47
Marisa McClellan: 
Kaela, that's my experience as well.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Marisa McClellan
10:47
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Kim: but the beans don't rest against the lids. And, there are commercial ones that have no BPA.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Jeanne in Seattle
10:47
Sean Timberlake: 
Mrs Wheelbarrow did the baked beans: http://www.mrswheelbarrow.com/2011/04/canning-yankee-style-baked-beans/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Sean Timberlake
10:47
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Thinking like pintos or black beans, Jacob's cattle, etc.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Jackie
10:47
Marisa McClellan: 
If you're trying to get away from BPA entirely, there are always the Tattler lids.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:47 Marisa McClellan
10:48
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Honey is extremely stable. Do not be afraid of crystals.... its very ok!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:48 Louise E Edsall
10:48
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Marisa: what is your experience with Tattler lids? Our readers report lid failure at around 6 months.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:48 Jeanne in Seattle
10:48
Sean Timberlake: 
Marisa, what's your experience with Tattler lids? My friend Anita was not happy with the fail rate, and Culinaria Eugenius says they're not recommended by MFPs
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:48 Sean Timberlake
10:48
[Comment From Evan D. Evan D. : ] 
Do pickles need a hot water bath if you plan on storing for a while before use?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:48 Evan D.
10:48
Sarah B. Hood: 
Marisa: yes, if I was canning for infants/toddlers I'd bite the bullet and buy Tattler.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:48 Sarah B. Hood
10:48
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Add yes, I make the mead as well!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:48 Louise E Edsall
10:49
[Comment From Tanya (indigomuse) Tanya (indigomuse) : ] 
@Louise I know! That's why I suggested it. Tweet me and we can set something up :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:49 Tanya (indigomuse)
10:49
Kim ODonnel: 
Looks like there's a canning play date in progress...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:49 Kim ODonnel
10:49
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Is corn difficult to can?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:49 Louise E Edsall
10:49
Marisa McClellan: 
I've actually had really good results with the Tattler lids. Not a single seal failure yet, and I've done at least 60 jars using them over two seasons now. I even reused some this year (as you're supposed to be able to do) and they worked perfectly.

http://www.foodinjars.com/2010/09/canning-101-preserving-with-tattlers-reusable-lids/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:49 Marisa McClellan
10:50
Sean Timberlake: 
Evan, if you intend to keep your pickles outside the fridge, then you'll need to water bath can them. Otherwise, just keep them in an unsealed jar in the fridge.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Sean Timberlake
10:50
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
all glass jars and lids... german made. http://www.weckcanning.com/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:50
Marisa McClellan: 
I have products that I canned over a year ago with Tattler lids and they're still holding fast.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Marisa McClellan
10:50
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
I'm thinking of that too, Louise, but figure it's easy enough to freeze.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Jackie
10:50
[Comment From Evan D. Evan D. : ] 
Oh and anyone here in FL? I'm trying to find an expert to teach me some of the basics. I've done just a few projects so far with tomato jam and pickled peppers.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Evan D.
10:50
Sarah B. Hood: 
A side note: I've talked to folks at Health Canada and it seem one really should try to keep infants/toddlers from ingesting BPA if possible. Adults can process it much better.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Sarah B. Hood
10:50
Sarah B. Hood: 
Deb, I know many people who like the Weck jars.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Sarah B. Hood
10:50
Sean Timberlake: 
Louise, that's another pressure canning task, but no more difficult than anything else. As Jackie points out, freezing is great too.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Sean Timberlake
10:50
[Comment From Evan D. Evan D. : ] 
@Sean - Thank you. That's the plan for this weekend depending on what's good at the market.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Evan D.
10:50
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Also, it's important to note that Tattler lids aren't USDA approved. And they are made of plastic. Apparently, they expand and contract with temperae changes. Making them prone to failure.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:50 Jeanne in Seattle
10:51
Kim ODonnel: 
I feel like we're getting a graduate course in preserving in one hour. This is wonderful. We've got just a few minutes left, fyi, so get your questions in!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:51 Kim ODonnel
10:51
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
I love getting a gift in Weck jar. I get to reuse and they stack well, look pretty.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:51 Jackie
10:51
[Comment From Stef Stef : ] 
Do any of you know of canning classes in Manhattan? I bought books but I feel like I need a good demo.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:51 Stef
10:52
Sean Timberlake: 
MFPs also don't recommend Weck jars for the same reason as Tattlers -- not as easy to tell if the seal is truly perfect (as opposed to dome lids). But that's probably more a factor of them not having tested them thoroughly yet.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Sean Timberlake
10:52
Marisa McClellan: 
Jeanne, that's interesting. I live in an apartment that doesn't vary much in temperature throughout the year, so that could have something to do with my success with the Tattler lids.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Marisa McClellan
10:52
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
This is the most fun for me today!! Need to feed my bees but I am enjoying this! Strawberry jam might be calling as well. I am so excited! Thanks everyone!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Louise E Edsall
10:52
Sarah B. Hood: 
Speaking of graduate courses, sadly, I should start to say my goodbye as I have to meet students for a 2 p.m. EST college writing class and will therefore have to leave shortly.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Sarah B. Hood
10:52
Kim ODonnel: 
Louise, so glad you are feeling inspired. Yes, you can!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Kim ODonnel
10:52
Kim ODonnel: 
Sarah, please share link to your new fab book!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Kim ODonnel
10:52
Marisa McClellan: 
Stef, I don't know of any canning classes in Manhattan, but Brooklyn Kitchen frequently offers them. http://www.thebrooklynkitchen.com/
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:52 Marisa McClellan
10:53
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Jeanne, I was just going to ask because they look plastic. I wonder if we'll learn down the road...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 Jackie
10:53
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Evan D -- your state's agricultural extension service should have a list of those who teach canning.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 cdthomas
10:53
Sarah B. Hood: 
Stef: Look up Just Food; they may be able to direct you to Manhattan canning classes.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 Sarah B. Hood
10:53
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Deb: the weck jars are pretty but again, not approved by USDA. I think they work OK, but you kind of have to know what you're doing. I don't recommend them do newbies.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 Jeanne in Seattle
10:53
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Thanks to many here who have lent their support to my first efforts!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 Jackie
10:53
[Comment From Kaela Kaela : ] 
@Stef Check with Emily (@nomnivorous on Twitter): I know she gave a free demo in Brooklyn recently. Not sure if more are in the works.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 Kaela
10:53
[Comment From Deb, Edmonton Alberta Deb, Edmonton Alberta : ] 
with glass lids my mom always turned upside down after cooling to see if any airbubbles came through the seal...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:53 Deb, Edmonton Alberta
10:54
Sarah B. Hood: 
Deb: that's not an approved method any more.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:54 Sarah B. Hood
10:54
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
No on the hunt for a pressure canner...trying to justify the expense...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:54 Jackie
10:54
Kim ODonnel: 
jackie, what if you share with a friend and split the cost?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:54 Kim ODonnel
10:54
Sean Timberlake: 
Jackie, it will pay itself back in no time. The Presto is only about $80.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:54 Sean Timberlake
10:54
[Comment From star star : ] 
going back to beans how much water do you put into the jar?
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:54 star
10:54
Marisa McClellan: 
Jackie, the pressure canner prices are pretty good on Amazon.com.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:54 Marisa McClellan
10:55
Sarah B. Hood: 
Whatever you do, don't buy an old bargain basement pressure canner. Get a new one.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:55 Sarah B. Hood
10:55
Kim ODonnel: 
Sean, Marisa, Sarah: Please tell folks where they can find you -- via website, twitter, etc...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:55 Kim ODonnel
10:55
Marisa McClellan: 
Star, that's not something I know off the top of my head. Check NCHFP for their info.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:55 Marisa McClellan
10:55
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Exactly what I'm thinking, Kim. I found a Presto 23 Qt on Amazon fro 84 incl free shipping. It's still a *gulp* for me.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:55 Jackie
10:56
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
How often do you have these tlks
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:56 Louise E Edsall
10:56
Marisa McClellan: 
I'm at foodinjars.com, twitter.com/foodinjars and facebook.com/foodinjars.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:56 Marisa McClellan
10:56
Sean Timberlake: 
Jackie, we have three other friends with pressure canners, and we share them around. Often each of us needs to use more than one at a time, so it's nice to split it up.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:56 Sean Timberlake
10:56
Kim ODonnel: 
Louise, I host a chat in this space a few Thursdays per month. In fact, next week at this time, Ann Cooper, the school lunch lady, will be joining us!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:56 Kim ODonnel
10:56
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Yes! Look for a pressure canner that is newer and is labeled "UL Approved." Old ones can be unsafe.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:56 Jeanne in Seattle
10:57
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Oh Marisa, just started to follow you. Thanks!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:57 Jackie
10:57
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Sean that sounds wonderful. I'm the only one in my building that cooks!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:57 Jackie
10:57
Sarah B. Hood: 
I'm at http://www.sarahbhood.com and http://www.totastings.blogspot.com, and my book We Sure Can! How Jams and Pickles are Reviving the Lure and Lore of Local Food is available at bookstores, Amazon and my publisher http://www.arsenalpulp.org.

And on that note I must say goodbye and thanks for the opportunity to be part of this fabulous exchange!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:57 Sarah B. Hood
10:57
Sean Timberlake: 
I run punkdomestics.com (twitter.com/punkdomestics and facebook.com/punkdomestics) and occasionally still blog at hedonia.seantimberlake.com (twitter.com/hedonia)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:57 Sean Timberlake
10:57
Kim ODonnel: 
Marisa's being shy, but she's got a book coming out next spring!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:57 Kim ODonnel
10:57
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Just going to follow all!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:57 Louise E Edsall
10:58
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Maybe I should host a fundraiser, everyone that donates $5 gets a quart of something...hahah
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:58 Jackie
10:58
Sean Timberlake: 
Jackie, that's a great idea! :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:58 Sean Timberlake
10:58
Marisa McClellan: 
It is true! And it's actually available for pre-order, should anyone be inclined.
http://www.amazon.com/Food-Jars-Preserving-Batches-Year-Round/dp/0762441437/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1316109487&sr=8-1
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:58 Marisa McClellan
10:58
Kim ODonnel: 
When you pool resources, preserving can eventually be very economical...
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:58 Kim ODonnel
10:58
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Jackie: you could be the "canning lady" in your building.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:58 Jeanne in Seattle
10:59
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
@Jackie -- why not? Kickstarter's been used for far less nummy projects....
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 cdthomas
10:59
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Marisa: I am so excited for you and to get the book!! And, I will be getting your book, too, Sarah!! Yay!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 Jeanne in Seattle
10:59
[Comment From star star : ] 
Thank you everyone! This has been wonderful!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 star
10:59
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Jeanne, i've certainly been called worse
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 Jackie
10:59
Marisa McClellan: 
Thanks for having us, Kim!
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 Marisa McClellan
10:59
Sean Timberlake: 
Thanks, Kim! This has been great.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 Sean Timberlake
10:59
Kim ODonnel: 
A big show of cans for a fabulous panel. Thank you all so very much. What a can-tastic hour.
Thursday September 15, 2011 10:59 Kim ODonnel
11:00
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Thanks everyone! Thanks to Marisa, Sean, and Sarah. I learned a lot. And thank you to Kim!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Jeanne in Seattle
11:00
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
This is great. Looking forward to sharing my guest post on my inaugural canning adventure.
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Jackie
11:00
Marisa McClellan: 
And thanks Jeanne! I'm excited for your book!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Marisa McClellan
11:00
Sean Timberlake: 
Am I the only one without a book? Boo. :)
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Sean Timberlake
11:00
Kim ODonnel: 
Next Thursday 9/22: Chef Ann Cooper on the state of school lunch...
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Kim ODonnel
11:00
Kim ODonnel: 
Sean, in due time...no doubt!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Kim ODonnel
11:00
Marisa McClellan: 
Gotta get cracking, Sean!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Marisa McClellan
11:00
[Comment From Raghavan Iyer Raghavan Iyer : ] 
thanks kim and the panel
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Raghavan Iyer
11:00
Sean Timberlake: 
Believe me, it's crossed my mind.
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:00 Sean Timberlake
11:01
[Comment From Jeanne in Seattle Jeanne in Seattle : ] 
Sean: I have a feeling it's only a matter of time!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:01 Jeanne in Seattle
11:01
[Comment From cdthomas cdthomas : ] 
Thank you, Kim, experts and co-canners!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:01 cdthomas
11:01
[Comment From Jackie Jackie : ] 
Thanks everyone for the inspiration!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:01 Jackie
11:01
[Comment From Louise E Edsall Louise E Edsall : ] 
Enjoyed!
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:01 Louise E Edsall
11:01
Kim ODonnel: 
Til then...thanks again.
Thursday September 15, 2011 11:01 Kim ODonnel
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Kim O’Donnel is a trained chef, nationally recognized online food personality, and a longtime journalist. She is the author of a new cookbook, The Meat Lover’s Meatless Cookbook.

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