Posts by Shoshanna Cohen


We invite people with noteworthy ideas about food to blog on Culinate.

Shoshanna Cohen is a writer based in Portland, Oregon. As a runner, hedonist, and culture geek, she is interested in food as fuel, as pleasure, and as language, sometimes all at once. She blogs about food and drinks at Socktails and about running at Nice Shorts.

Simplest cure

Jewish Mother Chicken Soup

By
July 7, 2011

Everybody needs to be Jewish-mothered sometimes. I hate it when my boyfriend gets sick, but I love taking care of him. Maybe it’s unfeminist of me. I don’t want to have kids or ever get married, but the Jewish-mother gene is strong, and there is something in me that just wants to make you chicken soup.

And even though I’m creative and believe in cultural exploration and nontraditional personal fulfillment, chicken soup has to be made a certain way. I don’t want any parsley. Get out of here with that wild rice. Don’t even talk to me about bouillon. When it comes to chicken soup, I’m a traditionalist.

Continue reading Simplest cure »

Shoshanna Cohen is a writer based in Portland, Oregon. As a runner, hedonist, and culture geek, she is interested in food as fuel, as pleasure, and as language, sometimes all at once. She blogs about food and drinks at Socktails and about running at Nice Shorts.

Hamantaschen any day

Make cookies

By
April 4, 2011

The running joke about Jewish holidays is that some goy always asks, “What is this holiday about?” And the answer is always, “They tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat.”

It doesn’t matter what holiday it is. There’s usually some lurid twist that makes for good storytelling, but the general idea is almost always the same.

The springtime holiday of Purim follows the classic formula. The holiday’s origin story is actually so scandalous and bloody that it isn’t even allowed to be in the Torah — it’s a separate scroll.

Continue reading Hamantaschen any day »

Shoshanna Cohen is a writer based in Portland, Oregon. As a runner, hedonist, and culture geek, she is interested in food as fuel, as pleasure, and as language, sometimes all at once. She blogs about food and drinks at Socktails and about running at Nice Shorts.

A fusion slaw

A slaw for pro-cultural evolutionaries

By
March 1, 2011

I’m having an incredibly conflicted moment. I know it’s no longer OK to admire "fusion cuisine" — it’s so 1990s, and the whole Asian-cultural-appropriation thing is so insensitive. Still, I happen really to like dishes made with ginger, sesame, and green onions, and I don’t feel a need for them to come from any one specific geographic source.

Quite the contrary, in fact. I think that white people who are obsessed with finding and replicating the most precise authentic traditions from other ethnicities are kind of pretentious. (They’re also ignoring the reality that cultures are fluid and dynamic, changing and appropriating one another all the time, and that’s a good thing.) I’m not saying I’m pro-exploitation or pro-boiling things down to the lowest common denominator. But I am pro-cultural evolution.

Continue reading A fusion slaw »

Advertisement
Culinate 8

Kale in the raw

Eight versions of kale salad

Eight ways to spin everyone’s favorite salad.

Subscribe
Graze: Bites from the Site
First Person

The secret sharer

A father’s legacy

The Culinate Interview

Mollie Katzen

The vegetarian-cooking pioneer

Reviews

Down South

Barbecue, tamales, cocktails, and more

Local Flavors

A winter romesco sauce

Good on everything

Most Popular Articles

Editor’s Choice