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Posts by Heather Arndt Anderson

I’ve been blogging for awhile now, but have been keeping it strictly about food since late 2006 or so. And though I’ve been cooking since childhood, it only started getting really interesting once I started writing about it.

I was a full-time botanist and natural resources consultant before I opted to put the day job on hiatus while I play house with my new baby boy. Now my growing, collecting, preparing and preserving food takes up a good chunk of my day.

My culinary focus is on finding cross-cultural uses for individual ingredients, and making ordinary food positively sing by coming at it from another angle. One part voodoo, one part sauce.

I am available for freelance writing or photography gigs and for menu development and consultation. Feel free to shoot me an email with any questions or feedback at heather@voodooandsauce.com. Thanks!


We invite people with noteworthy ideas about food to blog on Culinate.

Heather Arndt Anderson is a Portland, Oregon, native who is presently enjoying a respite from environmental consulting to raise a baby boy. She puts her botany degree to use, though, by growing as much food as she gathers. Here, she’ll talk about foraged food. Heather also keeps a blog, Voodoo & Sauce.

Eat stinging nettles

Test your mettle with these wildland greens

By
February 11, 2011

It’s been said that as long as you’re near water, you’ll never go hungry. Cattails have been hailed as “nature’s supermarket” and arrowhead has been called the “swamp potato”; watercress graces the menus of the fanciest restaurants.

But even Euell Gibbons, the father of the modern wild-food craze, makes a glaring omission in his forager’s bible, Stalking the Wild Asparagus: There is not a single mention of stinging nettles.

Stinging nettles are delicious, abundant, and oft-overlooked. And you don’t even have to live in the sticks to find them.

Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica) grow in swampy places and riparian corridors along streams throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and northern Africa. They resemble a mint, though they’re in their own botanical family (the Urticaceae). They’re easily identified by their pairs of deltoid (slightly triangular), dentate leaves (opposite-decussate in orientation), with fine spines covering the stems and leaves.

Continue reading Eat stinging nettles »

Heather Arndt Anderson is a Portland, Oregon, native who is presently enjoying a respite from environmental consulting to raise a baby boy. She puts her botany degree to use, though, by growing as much food as she gathers. Here, she’ll talk about foraged food. Heather also keeps a blog, Voodoo & Sauce.

Virtue? A fig!

Gathering figs in Portland, Oregon

By
September 23, 2010

Passing through the Clinton, Colonial Heights, and Ladd’s Addition neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon’s southeast quadrant on foot, I can’t miss the green orbs lying about. They litter back alleys and unimproved roadways, sticking bits of gravel to the soles of my shoes — or perhaps to your dog or bicycle wheels, depending.

Unlike when one happens upon fruit in the middle of God and everybody (e.g., in front of someone’s house), when in alleys one has the momentary privacy to stop and glance around for wary eyes before helping oneself to the oft-wasted bounty of moraceous lovelies.

Continue reading Virtue? A fig! »

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