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Muhamarra

Turkish Roasted Pepper and Walnut Spread

From the collection

Introduction

While this spread may be served immediately, it benefits from refrigeration and can be stored for up to five days. Don’t substitute ground cumin for the cumin seeds; omit it if you can’t find whole seeds. Almost any cracker with a bit of grain — whole wheat or multigrain — works just fine, though it’s important to adjust the salt and sugar in the dip to accommodate the flavors of different brands of crackers. Jarred or fresh-roasted peppers work equally well. If using jarred peppers, rinse and dry them well to remove any flavor of the brine in which they come packed. If you can’t find Aleppo pepper or pomegranate molasses locally, try Kalustyan's, a New York City retailer of spices and hard-to-find ingredients. Serve the muhamarra with pita, lavash, or Scandinavian hardbread, or alongside chicken, beef, or strong-flavored fish.

Ingredients

3 oz. whole-wheat or multi-grain crackers (such as Ak-Mak or Kashi)
¾ cup toasted walnuts
½ tsp. cumin seeds
1 Tbsp. Aleppo pepper
8 oz. roasted red peppers, rinsed and patted dry
2 Tbsp. pomegranate molasses
tsp. sugar
~ Salt and ground black pepper
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

Steps

  1. Combine the crackers, walnuts, cumin, and Aleppo pepper in the workbowl of a food processor and process until finely ground, scraping down the sides as necessary, 20 to 30 seconds. Add the roasted peppers, pomegranate molasses, and sugar and process until evenly blended and smooth, about 20 seconds. Add the salt and pepper to taste; drizzle olive oil over the top and pulse until just incorporated.
  2. Allow the dip to sit at least 2 hours before serving so the flavors meld.

Notes

For more great recipes, check out Matthew Card’s feature on fresh summer cooking.

This content is from the Matthew Card collection.

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1. by Ronnie Fein on Apr 25, 2008 at 3:36 PM PDT

Sadaf has pomegranate paste -- same as molasses -- (can buy online) and Penzey’s spices has Aleppo pepper (also available online)

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